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I am using nose test generators feature to run the same test with different contexts. Since it requires the following boiler plate for each test:

class TestSample(TestBase):

    def test_sample(self):
        for context in contexts:
            yield self.check_sample, context

    def check_sample(self, context):
        """The real test logic is implemented here"""
        pass

I decided to write the following decorator:

def with_contexts(contexts=None):        
    if contexts is None:
        contexts = ['twitter', 'linkedin', 'facebook']

    def decorator(f):
        @wraps(f)
        def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs):
            for context in contexts:
                yield f, self, context # The line which causes the error
        return wrapper
    return decorator

The decorator is used in the following manner:

class TestSample(TestBase):  

    @with_contexts()
    def test_sample(self, context):
        """The real test logic is implemented here"""
        var1 = self.some_valid_attribute

When the tests executed an error is thrown specifying that the attribute which is being accessed is not available. However If I change the line which calls the method to the following it works fine:

yield getattr(self, f.__name__), service

I understand that the above snippet creates a bound method where as in the first one self is passed manually to the function. However as far as my understanding goes the first snippet should work fine too. I would appreciate if anyone could clarify the issue.

The title of the question is related to calling instance methods in decorators in general but I have kept the description specific to my context.

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3  
Pro tip: When you get an error for something in Python, include the full traceback in your question, so we do not have to guess at what exactly goes wrong for you. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 10 '12 at 9:52
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2 Answers

You can use functools.partial to tie the wrapped function to self, just like a method would be:

from functools import partial

def decorator(f):
    @wraps(f)
    def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs):        
        for context in contexts:
            yield partial(f, self), context
    return wrapper

Now you are yielding partials instead, which, when called as yieldedvalue(context), will call f(self, context).

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Thank you for the response. As far as I understand the decorator yields a tuple in which the first element is the function, second is the reference to the object and ... Why does it throw an error in the first case and not the second? Btw: partials seems to be cool. –  Ifthikhan Dec 10 '12 at 9:49
    
Because you were yielding three values, not two, in your first case. Normally you need to yield the method, and the context, you were yielding a function, self and the context instead. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 10 '12 at 9:50
    
The function passed to the decorator is an unbound method? If I pass self as the first argument to it should it not behave as expected? I am aware that I am missing something here, I would appreciate if you can enlighten me. –  Ifthikhan Dec 10 '12 at 10:01
    
The decorator is given an function, not even an unbound method. Decoration takes place before the class is defined, method binding takes place when looking up the method through attribute access on the instance or class (the latter is an unbound method, the former a bound method). By using a partial, you are passing self as a first argument, but whatever calls your method is not expecting more than one argument. You didn't include a full traceback so I am speculating here. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 10 '12 at 10:16
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As far as I can tell, some things don't fit together. First, your decorator goes like

def with_contexts(contexts=None):        
    if contexts is None:
        contexts = ['twitter', 'linkedin', 'facebook']

    def decorator(f):
        @wraps(f)
        def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs):
            for context in contexts:
                yield f, self, context # The line which causes the error
        return wrapper
    return decorator

but you use it like

@with_contexts
def test_sample(self, context):
    """The real test logic is implemented here"""
    var1 = self.some_valid_attribute

This is wrong: this calls with_context(test_sample), but you need with_context()(test_sample). So do

@with_contexts()
def test_sample(self, context):
    """The real test logic is implemented here"""
    var1 = self.some_valid_attribute

even if you don't provide the contexts argument.

Second, you decorate the wrong function: your usage shows that the test function yields the check function for each context. The function you want to wrap does the job of the check function, but you have to name it after the test function.

Applying self to a method can be done with partial as Martijn writes, but it can as well be done the way Python does it under the hood: with

method.__get__(self, None)

or maybe better

method.__get__(self, type(self))

you can achieve the same. (Maybe your original version works as well, with yielding the function to be called and the arguments to use. It was not clear to me that this is the way it works.)

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The decorator call without "()" operator is a typo, corrected it. The reason I came up with the decorator is to avoid the boilerplate code of the loop and another method to yield. What confuses me is that if "self" is passed as the first argument to an unbounded method why is that it cannot accesses the attributes which belongs to it (self). It seems there is gap in my understanding here. –  Ifthikhan Dec 10 '12 at 10:12
    
@Ifthikhan As you didn't tell us the exception (including traceback) yet, we cannot exactly tell where the problem lies. It looks as if it should work, but what exactly is wrong is hard to tell from here... You could a print self to show what is really here as opposed to what should be here. –  glglgl Dec 10 '12 at 12:01
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