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I have a file.txt that contains the paths of the oracles that installed on my machine. from the registry example this file contains:

    ORACLE_HOME    REG_SZ    C:\oracle\product\11.2.0\dbhome_1
    ORACLE_HOME    REG_SZ    C:\oracle\product\11.2.0\dbhome_2

I want via my batch file to insert all the paths of the oracles into a list or something like list. How can I do it in batch file? thanks!

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Do you want them to be added into list of environment variables? –  anishsane Dec 10 '12 at 10:50
    
yes it is.I want in the end to enter to each path and do something –  zipi Dec 10 '12 at 11:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming you want a "list" of values in memory, not in a file:

I think most people prefer an "array" of values that can be accessed via an index value. (Note - batch does not have formal arrays, but they can be emulated).

The following simple code works great as long as none of the home paths contain !. Expansion of %%B will be corrupted if it contains ! and delayed expansion is enabled.

@echo off
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion

:: Read the file and create an "array" of home paths
:: This will fail if any of the paths contain !
set /a cnt=0
for /f "usebackq tokens=2*" %%A in ("file.txt") do (
  set /a cnt+=1
  set "home.!cnt!=%%B"
)

:: Access the "array" members
for /l %%N in (1 1 %cnt%) do echo !home.%%N!

You could probably run the above code for years in many environments and never run into a problem. But someone somewhere might include ! in the Oracle home path. There are a number of strategies to fix the above to deal with !. Below are three options:

Option 1 - The least amount of code, but the slowest due to CALL

@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion

:: Read the file and create an "array" of home paths
:: This will safely process all paths, regardless of value
set /a cnt=0
for /f "usebackq tokens=2*" %%A in ("file.txt") do (
  set /a cnt+=1
  call set "home.%%cnt%%=%%B"
)

:: Access the "array"
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
for /l %%N in (1 1 %cnt%) do echo !home.%%N!

Option 2 - An interesting and efficient method using FINDSTR to count the rows.

@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion

:: Read the file and create an "array" of home paths
:: This will safely process all paths, regardless of value
set /a cnt=0
for /f "tokens=1,3* delims=: " %%A in ('findstr /n "^" "file.txt"') do (
  set "home.%%A=%%C"
  set "cnt=%%A"
)

:: Access the "array" members
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
for /l %%N in (1 1 %cnt%) do echo !home.%%N!

Option 3 - An efficient method that uses delayed expansion toggling, but the most code

@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion

:: Read the file and create an "array" of home paths
:: This will safely process all paths, regardless of value
set /a cnt=0
for /f "usebackq tokens=2*" %%A in ("file.txt") do (
  set /a cnt+=1
  setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
  for %%N in (!cnt!) do (
    endlocal
    set "home.%%N=%%B"
  )
)

:: Access the "array"
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
for /l %%N in (1 1 %cnt%) do echo !home.%%N!

It is also possible to have a list of home paths in a single variable. Each path should be enclosed by quotes. The paths could be delimited by space, comma, semicolon, equal, or tab. I chose space.

The size of the list is limited because the maximum size of a batch environment variable is ~8191 bytes. This solution is also relatively slow due to the CALL. Neither of these issues are likely to be a problem in the real world.

@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion

:: Read the file and create a space delimited list of quoted home paths
:: This will safely process all paths, regardless of value
for /f "usebackq tokens=2*" %%A in ("file.txt") do (call set list=%%list%% "%%~B")

:: optional - remove leading space
(set list=%list:~1%)

:: Display the list
echo list=%list%

:: Access the list members
for %%F in (%list%) do echo %%~F
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot!can you explain me the last option I dont know what is usebackq,~B etc and if you can also the previous option.I am new in a batch file and it will very help me..thanks!!! –  zipi Dec 10 '12 at 12:14
    
@zipi - USEBACKQ is not really required in your case, but I used it in case you ever process a file name that contains spaces. Normally a quoted IN() clause is treated as a string. The USEBACKQ option treats the quoted IN() clause as a file name. Type HELP FOR from the command prompt for more info. I don't understand the remainder of what you are asking. In general, you can get help on any command by typing HELP commandName, or commandName /?. –  dbenham Dec 10 '12 at 12:22
    
maby you will know.I use your soloution and now I need help with something there:I use :for %%F in (%list%) do and I want to verify if there is a file name ss.tns in each path I try :for %%F in (%list%) do if exist %%~F\bin\ss.tns( echo sucsess )but it does not work to me –  zipi Dec 17 '12 at 17:30
for /f "tokens=3 delims= " %%a in (file.txt) do echo %%a >>paths.txt
share|improve this answer
    
I think the OP wants the values in memory, not a file. Also, this will fail as written if path contains space. Easily fixed by using "tokens=2* and %%b. –  dbenham Dec 10 '12 at 11:27

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