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I want to use multicore calculations in my applications. I begin to develop sample application with openMP (C++).

When I start it I found that my multicore calculation no faster than serial (even multicore calculations are slower than serial calculations in some cases):

./openmp_test 

Serial. Sum: 1.77544e+08 time: 21.84

Reduction, 2 threads. Sum: 1.77544e+08 time: 21.65

Two sections. Sum: 1.77544e+08 time: 60.65

My next think was to create boost::thread application for testing two threads on cores of CPU. Results:

./boost_thread_test 

Serial. Sum: 1.42146e+09 time: 179.64

Two boost threads. Sum: 1.42146e+09 time: 493.34

I use openSuSe (x64) powered laptop with Core i3 CPU inside.

Why so bad performance of multithreading I have?

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2  
You have to give more info about the problem you are applying multithreading to. Also, in which unit is your time? Threading adds overhead (threadcreation, context switching, false sharing) which you have to take into account when doing multithreading and which will overcome any benefit if your computation time is only very short. –  inf Dec 10 '12 at 10:00
    
It look like I found the solution. The problem was in boost::timer (i used it to look at elapse time). When I change boost::timer to native openMP time function omp_get_wtime() I get that omp_reduction function two times faster than serial (./openmp_test Serial. Sum: 1.77544e+08 time: 21.8169 Reduction, 2 threads. Sum: 1.77544e+08 time: 10.8623) –  Genuine Dec 10 '12 at 10:05
    
I elapse time in seconds. –  Genuine Dec 10 '12 at 10:09
    
On smaller sets, niter = 50,100..., using the boost thread example, results seem as expected - about twice less for the threaded run. Currently running the full 2000 example, but it seems it'll just confirm your results (the debug build has been running for over 10 mins) –  mtsvetkov Dec 10 '12 at 10:12
1  
Yeah, boost::timer measures cpu time and not wall clock time, which is no good when timing multithreaded applications. –  Imre Kerr Dec 10 '12 at 10:16

2 Answers 2

Both your codes, the one based on OpenMP sections and the one based on boost::thread, are likely victims of false sharing. False sharing occurs because temporal loads and stores operate on whole cache lines rather than directly on their operands. For example, the following statement:

sum = sum + value;

results in no only the value of sum being read from memory, updated and then written back, but rather a whole small section of memory, known as cache line being read and then written back. The cache line on modern x86 CPUs is usually of the order of 64 bytes, which means that not only the value of sum would be loaded from/stored to memory, but also 56 bytes around it. Cache lines also always start at addresses that are multiples of 64. What are the implications to your code?

In the OpenMP sections code you have:

double sum1;
double sum2;

...
// one section operates on sum1
...
// one section operates on sum2
...

sum1 and sum2 are located on the stack of the parent function omp_sections (a side note - the omp_ prefix is reserved for functions in the OpenMP runtime library; do not use it to name your own functions!). Being doubles, sum1 and sum2 are aligned on 8-byte boundary and in total take 16 bytes. The probability that they both would fall within the same cache line is 7/8 or 87.5%. What happens when the first thread wants to update sum1 is the following:

  • It reads the cache line that holds sum1
  • It updates the value of sum1
  • It notifies all other cores that the content of the cache line has changed so that they must invalidate it in their caches

The last part is very crucial - it is part of what is known as cache coherence. Since sum1 and sum2 are likely to fall in the same cache line, the core that executes the seconds thread has to invalidate its cache and reload it from a lower memory hierarchy level (e.g. from the shared last-level cache or from the main memory). Exactly the same happens when the second thread modifies the value of sum2.

One possible solution is to use the reduction clause as in the case where you use the OpenMP worksharing directive for:

double sum;

#pragma omp parallel sections reduction(+:sum) num_threads(2)
{
   ...
}

Another possible solution is to insert some padding between the two values as to make them more than one cache line apart:

double sum1;
char pad[64];
double sum2;

I don't know if the C++ standard gives any guarantee how local variables are to be laid on the stack, i.e. there might not be a guarantee that the compiler would not "optimise" the placement of the variables and would not reorder them like sum1, sum2, pad. If so they can be placed in a structure.

The problem is essentially the same with your threads case. The class data members take:

double *a;   // 4 bytes on x86, 8 bytes on x64
int niter;   // 4 bytes
int start;   // 4 bytes
int end;     // 4 bytes
// 4 bytes padding on x64 because doubles must be aligned
double sum;  // 8 bytes

The class data members take 24 bytes on x86 and 32 bytes on x64 (x86 in 64-bit mode). This means that two class instances can fit in the same cache line or are likely to share one. Again, you might add a padding data member after sum of at least 32 bytes in size:

class Calc
{
private:
    double *a;
    int niter;
    int start;
    int end;
    double sum;
    char pad[32];
...
};

Note that private variables, including the implicit private copies created by the reduction clause, likely reside on the individual threads' stack and hence are much more than one cache line apart, hence no false sharing occurs and the code runs faster in parallel.

Edit: I forgot to mention that most compilers remove unused variables during the optimisation phase. In the case with the OpenMP sections the padding is mostly optimised out. This could be cured by applying alignment attributes instead (warning: possibly GCC specific):

double sum1 __attribute__((aligned(64))) = 0;
double sum2 __attribute__((aligned(64))) = 0;

Although this removes the false sharing, it still prevents most compilers from using register optimisations because sum1 and sum2 are shared variables. Hence it will still be slower than the version that uses reduction. On my test system aligning both variables on a cache line boundary reduces the execution time from 56 seconds to 30 seconds, given a serial execution time of 20 seconds. This only has to show that sometimes OpenMP constructs spoil some compiler optimisations and the parallel code might run much slower that the serial one so one has to be careful.

You can make both variables lastprivate and this would allow the compiler to perform register optimisations on them:

#pragma omp parallel sections num_threads(2) lastprivate(sum1,sum2)

With this modification the sections code run just as fast as the one with the worksharing directive. Another possible solution is to accumulate to local variables and assign to sum1 and sum2 after the loops have finished:

#pragma omp section
{
    double s = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < niter / 2; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < niter; j++)
        {
            for (int k = 0; k < niter; k++)
            {
                double x = sin(a[i]) * cos(a[j]) * sin(a[k]);
                s += x;
            }
        }
    }
    sum1 = s;
}
// Same for the other section

This one is essentially equivalent to threadprivate(sum1).

Unfortunately I don't have boost installed so I cannot test your threaded code. Try to execute the whole calculation using Calc::run() so to see what implications have using a C++ class on the speed.

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thank you very much for your advices. Using of reduction clause is speedup calculations of sections to the same time as in case of parallel for. Addition of char pad[64] in case of sections and char pad[32] for boost::thread doesn't speedup calculations (it still 1.5 times slower than serial). –  Genuine Dec 10 '12 at 15:24
    
@Genuine, the padding is most likely removed as an unused variable. See my updated answer. –  Hristo Iliev Dec 10 '12 at 16:35

Too long to put it as a comment

There's something very strange with the implementation of the sin and cos.

(Edit: of course it has nothing to do with sin and cos, but with the access patter to the array a).

(Edit 2: and also a great number of redundant sin and cos calls is eliminated. In the function single_thread, the compiler moves loop invariant calls to sin and cos outside the loops, but it does not move them in the Calc::run method. So this explains the difference in performance. Time to open a question why the compiler does different things :) )

Compare the program with and without the following change.

While the single-threaded version executes for roughly the same time (about 12sec), the original multi-threaded version executes for about 18 sec (i.e. slower than the single-threaded version), but the modified multi-threaded version executes for about 7 sec (niter == 1000).

--- thread-smp-orig.cxx        2012-12-10 12:40:03.547640307 +0200
+++ thread-smp.cxx        2012-12-10 12:37:27.990650712 +0200
@@ -26,11 +26,13 @@ public:
         double x;
         for (int i = start; i < end; i++)
         {
+            double sai = sin(a[i]);
             for (int j = 0; j < niter; j++)
             {
+                double caj = cos(a[j]);
                 for (int k = 0; k < niter; k++)
                 {
-                    x = sin(a[i]) * cos(a[j]) * sin(a[k]);
+                    x = sai * caj * sin(a[k]);
                     sum += x;
                 }
             }
@@ -48,11 +50,13 @@ double single_thread(double a[], const i
     double x;
     for (int i = 0; i < niter; i++)
     {
+        double sai = sin(a[i]);
         for (int j = 0; j < niter; j++)
         {
+            double caj = cos(a[j]);
             for (int k = 0; k < niter; k++)
             {
-                x = sin(a[i]) * cos(a[j]) * sin(a[k]);
+                x = sai * caj * sin(a[k]);
                 sum += x;
             }
         }
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Thanks you very much for your advices. Your patch is really speedup calculations in case of boost::thread (two threads are two times faster then serial function on my laptop). –  Genuine Dec 10 '12 at 15:37
    
Also I just found that same patch speedup calculations in case of two omp sections too. –  Genuine Dec 10 '12 at 15:48
    
@Genuine, if you look at the dissassembly of the original program, you can see that in the Calc::run method, all the calls to sin/cos are in the innermost loop. But in the function single_thread the compiler moves them outside the loop all by himself, as if the patch was applied. –  chill Dec 10 '12 at 16:15

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