Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible via an attribute of some sort to serialize a string as CDATA using the .Net XmlSerializer?

share|improve this question
1  
One thing worth noting about the two answers is that you don't need CDataContent if you're only reading XML. XmlSerializer.Deserialize will automatically turn it into text for you. –  Chris S Nov 26 '11 at 12:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 41 down vote accepted
[XmlRoot("root")]
public class Sample1Xml
{
    internal Sample1Xml()
    {
    }

    [XmlElement("node")]
    public NodeType Node { get; set; }

    #region Nested type: NodeType

    public class NodeType
    {
        [XmlAttribute("attr1")]
        public string Attr1 { get; set; }

        [XmlAttribute("attr2")]
        public string Attr2 { get; set; }

        [XmlIgnore]
        public string Content { get; set; }

        [XmlText]
        public XmlNode[] CDataContent
        {
            get
            {
                var dummy = new XmlDocument();
                return new XmlNode[] {dummy.CreateCDataSection(Content)};
            }
            set
            {
                if (value == null)
                {
                    Content = null;
                    return;
                }

                if (value.Length != 1)
                {
                    throw new InvalidOperationException(
                        String.Format(
                            "Invalid array length {0}", value.Length));
                }

                Content = value[0].Value;
            }
        }
    }

    #endregion
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Very useful. Didn't know this was possible! –  Jagd Sep 4 '09 at 15:34
6  
To me this doesn't seem like the most elegant solution. Is this the only possible way of doing this? –  jamesaharvey Sep 4 '09 at 15:36
1  
I think this is the only way to accomplish this, I've seen this topic elsewhere and always the same answer. The example from Philip is a little cleaner but the same concept. The only other way I know of is to implement your own <a href="msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…; on a class that represents the CDATA content. –  csharptest.net Sep 4 '09 at 16:57
    
I wanted to do the same thing because it seems like storing strings as CDATA appears to imply less processing time, as with it we could 'only' read/write string 'as is'. How expensive is involving XmlDocument/XmlCDataSection instances? –  tishma Apr 9 '12 at 15:04
2  
Philip's solution slightly farther down the page is a tidier thing to do. –  Karl May 17 '12 at 15:27

In addition to the way posted by John Saunders, you can use an XmlCDataSection as the type directly, although it boils down to nearly the same thing:

   private string _message;
   [XmlElement("CDataElement")]
   public XmlCDataSection Message
   {  
      get 
      { 
         XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
         return doc.CreateCDataSection( _message);
      }
      set
      {
         _message = value.Value;
      }
   }
share|improve this answer
    
@Philip, does this work for deserialization? I've been seeing notes saying that the setter will receive an XmlText value. –  John Saunders Sep 4 '09 at 19:55
    
@John Saunders - It actually receives a XmlCharacterData value in the setter during deserialization, which is what the call to .Value is for in the setter ( I originally had it as ToString() from memory, but that was incorrect. ) –  Philip Rieck Sep 8 '09 at 14:41
    
Works perfectly! –  BigJoe714 Mar 28 '12 at 14:39
[Serializable]
public class MyClass
{
    public MyClass() { }

    [XmlIgnore]
    public string MyString { get; set; }
    [XmlElement("MyString")]
    public System.Xml.XmlCDataSection MyStringCDATA
    {
        get
        {
            return new System.Xml.XmlDocument().CreateCDataSection(MyString);
        }
        set
        {
            MyString = value.Value;
        }
    }
}

Usage:

MyClass mc = new MyClass();
mc.MyString = "<test>Hello World</test>";
XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyClass));
StringWriter writer = new StringWriter();
serializer.Serialize(writer, mc);
Console.WriteLine(writer.ToString());

Output:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-16"?>
<MyClass xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <MyString><![CDATA[<test>Hello World</test>]]></MyString>
</MyClass>
share|improve this answer
4  
This should be the accepted answer –  Jeroen K Jun 18 '13 at 12:16
    
Agreed, this worked for me. –  Richard Aug 30 '13 at 20:10
    
This just saved my day. Thank you. –  Robert Sep 9 at 14:59

In the class to be serialized:

public CData Content { get; set; }

And the CData class:

public class CData : IXmlSerializable
{
    private string _value;

    /// <summary>
    /// Allow direct assignment from string:
    /// CData cdata = "abc";
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static implicit operator CData(string value)
    {
        return new CData(value);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Allow direct assigment to string
    /// string str = cdata;
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="cdata"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static implicit operator string(CData cdata)
    {
        return cdata._value;
    }

    public CData() : this(string.Empty)
    {
    }

    public CData(string value)
    {
        _value = value;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _value;
    }

    public System.Xml.Schema.XmlSchema GetSchema()
    {
        return null;
    }

    public void ReadXml(System.Xml.XmlReader reader)
    {
        _value = reader.ReadElementString();
    }

    public void WriteXml(System.Xml.XmlWriter writer)
    {
        writer.WriteCData(_value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.