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Just out of curiosity, does anyone know if there is any major performance difference when you do...

Select something Where foo=1 

...and...

Select something Where foo In(1)    #just one item not multiple

...both on Mysql and Postgresql in single or joined SQL queries.

The thing is I'm building Ruby on Rails scopes and I'm wondering which approach is better,

crate one scope for multiple items (IN) and one for single item that will use equal (=)

scope :with_owner_ids, lambda{|owner_class, *ids| where(owner_type: owner_class.model_name, owner_id: ids.flatten)}
scope :with_owner, lambda{|owner| where(owner_type: owner.class.model_name, owner_id: owner.id)}
#... where `foos`.`owner_class`='User' and `foos`.`owner_id` = 15

or cleaner, create scope for multiple items (IN) and than just pass this scope to the other scope for single item (IN as well )

scope :with_owner_ids, lambda{|owner_class, *ids| where(owner_type: owner_class.model_name, owner_id: ids.flatten)}
scope :with_owner, lambda{|owner| with_owner_ids(owner.class, owner.id)}
#... where `foos`.`owner_class`='User' and `foos`.`owner_id` IN (15)
share|improve this question
1  
-1: Simply test it yourself. –  Daniel Hilgarth Dec 10 '12 at 10:34
2  
Use EXPLAIN to see the differences, works in PostgreSQL and MySQL –  Frank Heikens Dec 10 '12 at 10:36
1  
@DanielHilgarth Although that could be good advice if it showed how as Frank did, I don't think it deserves a downvote. The question is on topic, is well written and is useful. –  Clodoaldo Neto Dec 10 '12 at 10:39
1  
@Clodoaldo: It shows no research effort at all. That justifies a downvote as explained by the tooltip of the downvote button. –  Daniel Hilgarth Dec 10 '12 at 10:43
1  
@DanielHilgarth I think you misunderstood purpose of StackOwerflow, I'm asking if someone have done research of this kind, and if no-one does I'll do it myself :-\ ... this is community of exchanging knowledge by asking questions, not publishing researches –  equivalent8 Dec 10 '12 at 11:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

PostgreSQL example on a very simple table:

CREATE TABLE a (
    a_id integer
    , t_id integer
);

COPY a
FROM STDIN;
1   1
2   1
3   1
4   4
\.

EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM a WHERE t_id IN (1);

 Seq Scan on a  (cost=0.00..36.75 rows=11 width=8) (actual time=0.056..0.059 rows=3 loops=1)
   Filter: (t_id = 1)
 Total runtime: 41.795 ms

From the Filter: (t_id = 1) part it is clear that IN (1) was translated into a simple equality check, therefore no difference between the two forms.

I leave the MySQL part to others :)

share|improve this answer
    
It might be interesting to see another example with an index on t_id (which would probably prove your point even better) –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 10 '12 at 12:03
    
You will also occasionally see optimizers rewriting in the other direction: converting "...where x in ('a', 'b')..." to "...where x = 'a'.... union ... where x = 'b'..." –  Lord Peter Dec 10 '12 at 12:04
    
@LordPeter Could you give an example? I've never seen that so far. –  dezso Dec 10 '12 at 12:05
    
@dezso Oh dear! I can't put my hands on one just now. And perhaps more likely to be rewritten as ((x='a') or (x='b')). But just trying to illustrate that if queries are semantically the same, then the optimizer is generally free to rewrite them. –  Lord Peter Dec 10 '12 at 12:17
1  
@LordPeter I'm wondering whether we are talking about the same PostgreSQL :) The same testbed as above, IN (1,2,3,4) becomes (t_id = ANY ('{1,2,3,4}'::integer[])) –  dezso Dec 10 '12 at 12:21

I played around with MySQL EXPLAIN:

equal

mysql> explain extended select * from document_name_ownerships as dno join document_names as dn on dn.id = dno.document_name_id  where dn.id = 18 ;
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+----------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref   | rows | filtered | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+----------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | dn    | const | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | const |    1 |   100.00 |             |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | dno   | ALL   | NULL          | NULL    | NULL    | NULL  |   81 |   100.00 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+----------+-------------+
2 

rows in set, 1 warning (0.00 sec)

in()

mysql> explain extended select * from document_name_ownerships as dno join document_names as dn on dn.id = dno.document_name_id  where dn.id in(18) ;
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+----------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref   | rows | filtered | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+----------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | dn    | const | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | const |    1 |   100.00 |             |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | dno   | ALL   | NULL          | NULL    | NULL    | NULL  |   81 |   100.00 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+----------+-------------+
2 rows in set, 1 warning (0.01 sec)

So it seems the equal (=) was negligibly faster than IN() when it comes to one record

but interestingly, when I done several items the results were same:

mysql> explain extended select * from document_name_ownerships as dno join document_names as dn on dn.id = dno.document_name_id  where dn.id = 18 or dn.id=17  or dn.id=19;
> (0.00 sec)

mysql> explain extended select * from document_name_ownerships as dno join document_names as  dn on dn.id = dno.document_name_id  where dn.id in (18, 17, 19);
> (0.00 sec)

but don't know if this results can be trusted on live server because on my development machine I got SSD drives ... but it seems the same to me


Updated

with 70000 records

select * from document_name_ownerships as dno join document_names as dn on dn.id = dno.document_name_id  where dn.id = 60811;
1 row in set (0.04 sec)

select * from document_name_ownerships as dno join document_names as dn on dn.id = dno.document_name_id  where dn.id in( 60811);
1 row in set (0.04 sec)

multiple

select * from document_name_ownerships as dno join document_names as dn on dn.id = dno.document_name_id  where dn.id in( 60800, 11111, 22222, 40000);
4 rows in set (0.07 sec)

select * from document_name_ownerships as dno join document_names as dn on dn.id = dno.document_name_id  where dn.id = 60800 or dn.id = 11111 or dn.id = 22222 or dn.id = 40000;
4 rows in set (0.08 sec)
share|improve this answer
    
hmmmmm... maybe the difference was due to system load or something, I got now 0.00 sec in all above examples :-\ –  equivalent8 Dec 12 '12 at 10:14
    
Looks like you need an index on dno.document_name_id. And did you test on a table with some serious amount of data? A query on a (almost) empty table is always fast, no matter what. –  Frank Heikens Dec 12 '12 at 10:41
    
hmm yeah, good point, guess I didn't thought about that, I'll update this once I do some database seeding with more records, currently there is like 80 records which is ridiculous –  equivalent8 Dec 12 '12 at 12:56
    
updated with 70 000 records –  equivalent8 Dec 13 '12 at 11:54
    
And the results from EXPLAIN? Is the database using an index for these queries? –  Frank Heikens Dec 13 '12 at 11:58

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