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This seems like pretty basic functionality, but my initial searches didn't yield anything...

I want to do a login from a console app using ActiveDirectory, and set the Thread.CurrentPrincipal if the login is successful. All the solutions I've found online assume you want to use HTTP authentication. How do I do this from a non-HTTP context?

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Do you need Identification, Impersonation, or Delegation? –  Scott Chamberlain Dec 10 '12 at 11:18

2 Answers 2

The Simplest way to do it is make some P/Invoke calls to get the logon token then pass that in to the WindowsIdentity constructor (which you pass to the WindowsPrincipal constructor)

This question helped me out in the past which will get you 90% of the way there, unless you need to do Impersonation, then it gets you 100% of the way there :)

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

/// <summary>
/// Implements P/Invoke Interop calls to the operating system.
/// </summary>
internal static class NativeMethods
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The type of logon operation to perform.
    /// </summary>
    internal enum LogonType : int
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// This logon type is intended for users who will be interactively
        /// using the computer, such as a user being logged on by a
        /// terminal server, remote shell, or similar process.
        /// This logon type has the additional expense of caching logon
        /// information for disconnected operations; therefore, it is
        /// inappropriate for some client/server applications, such as a
        /// mail server.
        /// </summary>
        Interactive = 2,

        /// <summary>
        /// This logon type is intended for high performance servers to
        /// authenticate plaintext passwords.
        /// The LogonUser function does not cache credentials for this
        /// logon type.
        /// </summary>
        Network = 3,

        /// <summary>
        /// This logon type is intended for batch servers, where processes
        /// may be executing on behalf of a user without their direct
        /// intervention.  This type is also for higher performance servers
        /// that process many plaintext authentication attempts at a time,
        /// such as mail or Web servers.
        /// The LogonUser function does not cache credentials for this
        /// logon type.
        /// </summary>
        Batch = 4,

        /// <summary>
        /// Indicates a service-type logon.  The account provided must have
        /// the service privilege enabled.
        /// </summary>
        Service = 5,

        /// <summary>
        /// This logon type is for GINA DLLs that log on users who will be
        /// interactively using the computer.
        /// This logon type can generate a unique audit record that shows
        /// when the workstation was unlocked.
        /// </summary>
        Unlock = 7,

        /// <summary>
        /// This logon type preserves the name and password in the
        /// authentication package, which allows the server to make
        /// connections to other network servers while impersonating the
        /// client.  A server can accept plaintext credentials from a
        /// client, call LogonUser, verify that the user can access the
        /// system across the network, and still communicate with other
        /// servers.
        /// NOTE: Windows NT:  This value is not supported.
        /// </summary>
        NetworkCleartext = 8,

        /// <summary>
        /// This logon type allows the caller to clone its current token
        /// and specify new credentials for outbound connections.  The new
        /// logon session has the same local identifier but uses different
        /// credentials for other network connections.
        /// NOTE: This logon type is supported only by the
        /// LOGON32_PROVIDER_WINNT50 logon provider.
        /// NOTE: Windows NT:  This value is not supported.
        /// </summary>
        NewCredentials = 9
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Specifies the logon provider.
    /// </summary>
    internal enum LogonProvider : int
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Use the standard logon provider for the system.
        /// The default security provider is negotiate, unless you pass
        /// NULL for the domain name and the user name is not in UPN format.
        /// In this case, the default provider is NTLM.
        /// NOTE: Windows 2000/NT:   The default security provider is NTLM.
        /// </summary>
        Default = 0,

        /// <summary>
        /// Use this provider if you'll be authenticating against a Windows
        /// NT 3.51 domain controller (uses the NT 3.51 logon provider).
        /// </summary>
        WinNT35 = 1,

        /// <summary>
        /// Use the NTLM logon provider.
        /// </summary>
        WinNT40 = 2,

        /// <summary>
        /// Use the negotiate logon provider.
        /// </summary>
        WinNT50 = 3
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// The type of logon operation to perform.
    /// </summary>
    internal enum SecurityImpersonationLevel : int
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The server process cannot obtain identification information
        /// about the client, and it cannot impersonate the client.  It is
        /// defined with no value given, and thus, by ANSI C rules,
        /// defaults to a value of zero.
        /// </summary>
        Anonymous = 0,

        /// <summary>
        /// The server process can obtain information about the client,
        /// such as security identifiers and privileges, but it cannot
        /// impersonate the client.  This is useful for servers that export
        /// their own objects, for example, database products that export
        /// tables and views.  Using the retrieved client-security
        /// information, the server can make access-validation decisions
        /// without being able to use other services that are using the
        /// client's security context.
        /// </summary>
        Identification = 1,

        /// <summary>
        /// The server process can impersonate the client's security
        /// context on its local system.  The server cannot impersonate the
        /// client on remote systems.
        /// </summary>
        Impersonation = 2,

        /// <summary>
        /// The server process can impersonate the client's security
        /// context on remote systems.
        /// NOTE: Windows NT:  This impersonation level is not supported.
        /// </summary>
        Delegation = 3
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Logs on the user.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="userName">Name of the user.</param>
    /// <param name="domain">The domain.</param>
    /// <param name="password">The password.</param>
    /// <param name="logonType">Type of the logon.</param>
    /// <param name="logonProvider">The logon provider.</param>
    /// <param name="token">The token.</param>
    /// <returns>True if the function succeeds, false if the function fails.
    /// To get extended error information, call GetLastError.</returns>
    [DllImport("advapi32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, SetLastError = true)]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    internal static extern bool LogonUser(
        string userName,
        string domain,
        string password,
        LogonType logonType,
        LogonProvider logonProvider,
        out IntPtr token);

    /// <summary>
    /// Duplicates the token.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="existingTokenHandle">The existing token
    /// handle.</param>
    /// <param name="securityImpersonationLevel">The security impersonation
    /// level.</param>
    /// <param name="duplicateTokenHandle">The duplicate token
    /// handle.</param>
    /// <returns>True if the function succeeds, false if the function fails.
    /// To get extended error information, call GetLastError.</returns>
    [DllImport("advapi32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, SetLastError = true)]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    internal static extern bool DuplicateToken(
        IntPtr existingTokenHandle,
        SecurityImpersonationLevel securityImpersonationLevel,
        out IntPtr duplicateTokenHandle);

    /// <summary>
    /// Closes the handle.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="handle">The handle.</param>
    /// <returns>True if the function succeeds, false if the function fails.
    /// To get extended error information, call GetLastError.</returns>
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, SetLastError = true)]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    internal static extern bool CloseHandle(IntPtr handle);
}

followed by

    IntPtr token;

    if (!NativeMethods.LogonUser(
        this.userName,
        this.domain,
        this.password,
        NativeMethods.LogonType.NewCredentials,
        NativeMethods.LogonProvider.Default,
        out token))
    {
        throw new Win32Exception();
    }

    try
    {
        IntPtr tokenDuplicate;

        if (!NativeMethods.DuplicateToken(
            token,
            NativeMethods.SecurityImpersonationLevel.Impersonation,
            out tokenDuplicate))
        {
            throw new Win32Exception();
        }

        try
        {
            using (WindowsImpersonationContext impersonationContext =
                new WindowsIdentity(tokenDuplicate).Impersonate())
            {
                // Do stuff as a impersonated context here.

                impersonationContext.Undo();
                return;
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            if (tokenDuplicate != IntPtr.Zero)
            {
                if (!NativeMethods.CloseHandle(tokenDuplicate))
                {
                    // Uncomment if you need to know this case.
                    ////throw new Win32Exception();
                }
            }
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (token != IntPtr.Zero)
        {
            if (!NativeMethods.CloseHandle(token))
            {
                // Uncomment if you need to know this case.
                ////throw new Win32Exception();
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Wow, comprehensive! But I see the context gets disposed. Is that necessary? I specifically want to set the Thread.CurrentPrincipal property according to the logged in user, i.e. I want the logged in user to stay in memory for the duration of the session. How would you do that using this pattern? –  Shaul Behr Dec 10 '12 at 12:16
    
Once you have your WindowsIdentity you can make a WindowsPrincipal and set your CurrentThread.Identity property. You need to clean up your pointers you created but that can put that in the Dispose() function of whatever class is using the CurrentThread.Identity property. –  Scott Chamberlain Dec 10 '12 at 12:22
    
The only two "Required" calls are on CloseHandle for the two tokens you got out from the P/Invoke calls. everything else is handled by the garbage collector if you where so inclined. But be careful of resource leaks if you decide to just let the garbage collector handle it. –  Scott Chamberlain Dec 10 '12 at 12:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This may not be as "proper" as @ScottChamberlain's answer, but I found it worked for me.

First, I did the authentication using forms authentication, as described here. The code there is in VB; here's a C# implementation below:

var domainAndUsername = domain + "\\" + userName;
var entry = new DirectoryEntry(myADServicePath, domainAndUsername, password);
// Bind to the native AdsObject to force authentication.
var obj = entry.NativeObject;
var search = new DirectorySearcher(entry) { Filter = "(SAMAccountName=" + userName + ")" };
search.PropertiesToLoad.Add("cn");
var result = search.FindOne();
if (null == result)
{
  return null; // or whatever else indicates failed login in your context
}

Then, to set the current principal, I just used a GenericPrincipal:

var identity = new GenericIdentity(userName);
var principal = new GenericPrincipal(identity, myRoles); // I'll leave it to you to work out what roles there are
Thread.CurrentPrincipal = principal;        
share|improve this answer
    
As long as you are not attempting to do impersonation (ie: connect to a UNC share with credentials other than the logged on user) that method will work great. That was the reason I asked my "Identification, Impersonation, or Delegation?" question, so I took a stab in the dark and gave you the Impersonation answer. Note that whatever reason you are setting the identity what ever is checking the identity may not like it if you are passing a Generic Identity instead of some form of authenticated identity. –  Scott Chamberlain Dec 10 '12 at 15:45
1  
Here is something that may be useful to you, it is a Mock IPrincipal to use in testing (I for the life of me can't remember how i found it, but maybe it may be useful to you) –  Scott Chamberlain Dec 10 '12 at 16:28
    
@ScottChamberlain cool - thanks for that link, might be useful. And thanks for the rest of your help! –  Shaul Behr Dec 10 '12 at 16:30
    
I broke the link trying to fix the comments at the top of the post, here is the new link –  Scott Chamberlain Dec 10 '12 at 16:45

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