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I have a simple program in C, with compiler switches: /GS-

It is just a proof of concept of changing the EIP to the location of the machine code string.

Let's say we set EIP = 0x012f5000, which puts the EIP at the address of the following array:

char code[] = "\x00\x00\x8B\x00\x00";

I don't know exactly what these instructions will do, but the x00 instructions appear to be noops. Switching the EIP to any other location in the program seems to cause to issue, but when I point EIP to this array's address, I get some "access violation" exception at that location of the EIP.

Why am I getting this error? Is this because of some kind of Windows protection mechanism ? Or is it that Windows cannot run intructions in this string form? How do you get the program to execute these instructions?

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Which underlying CPU executing the machine code? If x86 then 0x00 is not NOP. NOP has the opcode '0x90'. –  David J Dec 10 '12 at 11:04
    
@Fermat2357: there are plenty of opcodes that are effectively NOP, not just the single-byte opcode 0x90. –  0xC0000022L Dec 10 '12 at 11:07
    
Yes my fault, if you identify NOP with all the possible instructions doing nothing you are right. –  David J Dec 10 '12 at 11:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess you using x86 32 bit machine code if not my answer is not correct.

Your machine code gives the following

0000          ADD BYTE PTR DS:[EAX],AL
8B00          MOV EAX,DWORD PTR DS:[EAX]
00XX          ADD BYTE PTR ???  ; depends on the next byte

As you can see if you try to execute this it try to access the memory at the address whatever in eax is. It also dont end with a ret or something else, so it will run straight forward without care what follows. In most cases this will crash. Anyway it is also possible that you cannot execute code defined in the DATA segment.

If you want to execute some shellcode you can try like the following simple template. The idea is to create the code on the stack and execute it there. The given machine code function is not well implemented but at least correct and will not cause a crash. Its equivalent to the C code

void f( void ) { return; };

compiled by VC++ in Debug mode.

#include <stdio.h> 

int main() 
{ 
    const char code[] = "\x55\x8B\xEC\x81\xEC\xC0\x00\x00" 
    "\x00\x53\x56\x57\x8D\xBD\x40\xFF" 
    "\xFF\xFF\xB9\x30\x00\x00\x00\xB8" 
    "\xCC\xCC\xCC\xCC\xF3\xAB\x5F\x5E" 
    "\x5B\x8B\xE5\x5D\xC3"; 

    printf("Start execution\r\n"); 
    ((void (*)())code)(); 
    printf("End execution\r\n"); 
    _getch(); 
}

If the above dont work you can try.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <stdio.h> 
#include <Windows.h>

int main() 
{ 
    const char code[] = "\x55\x8B\xEC\x81\xEC\xC0\x00\x00" 
    "\x00\x53\x56\x57\x8D\xBD\x40\xFF" 
    "\xFF\xFF\xB9\x30\x00\x00\x00\xB8" 
    "\xCC\xCC\xCC\xCC\xF3\xAB\x5F\x5E" 
    "\x5B\x8B\xE5\x5D\xC3"; 

    void *exec = VirtualAlloc(0, sizeof(code), MEM_COMMIT, PAGE_EXECUTE_READWRITE);
    memcpy(exec, code, sizeof(code));

    printf("Start execution\r\n"); 
    ((void(*)())exec)();
    printf("End execution\r\n"); 
    //_getch(); 
}

The idea is to use allocated memory pages with the flag PAGE_EXECUTE_READWRITE.

share|improve this answer
    
You should also be sure that you don't have DEP enabled on this program. Or if you do, you need to use VirtualProtect to change the memory to executable. –  jcopenha Dec 10 '12 at 14:26
    
@Fermat this is a good answer, but I compiled this exact source in VS2010 with /NXCOMPAT:NO, and I still get the "access violation" exception. –  T. Webster Dec 10 '12 at 17:09
    
Yes I see, I have the same behavior under VS2010 and Win7. In this case it is a security feature. I dont know a compiler flag to remove this, so I updated my answer to a more secure method. –  David J Dec 10 '12 at 17:26
1  
The x86 have some features in the protected mode to prevent execution or write access to specific memory pages. This features was not fully implemented by microsoft for a long time. It seems for security reason now it is not possible in any case to execute code on the stack anymore. In my updated answer I now allocate memory with the correct rights. –  David J Dec 10 '12 at 17:34
1  
It gives access violation because the stack is now memory without the right to execute code. Take a look to the features of the protected mode of the x86 to understand why. –  David J Dec 10 '12 at 17:42

Fermat's answer is good, but I like this a little better

__asm { jmp [exec] }
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