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Can you help me get this query to work?

I have a log query that counts logged items (table: log) for each active user (table: user, status: 1 (for active)) by day (table: calendar, including days without rows.

The following query takes 10 minutes to run! How can I run this in seconds rather than minutes?

SELECT
    c.day, COUNT(u.id) AS count
FROM calendar c
LEFT JOIN log l
    ON c.day = DATE_FORMAT(l.db_timestamp , '%Y-%m-%d')
LEFT JOIN user u
    ON l.user_id = u.id
    AND u.user_status_type_id = 1
WHERE
    c.day > '2012-12-01'
    AND c.day < '2013-01-01'
GROUP BY
    c.day

Table structure:

calendar (~3,000 rows)
day
===============================
2012-01-01
2012-01-02
2012-01-03
...
2020-01-01


log (~30,000 rows)
id  user_id  db_timestamp
================================
1   1        2012-01-01 01:01:01
1   2        2012-01-01 01:01:01
1   1        2012-01-01 01:01:01

user (~3,000,000 rows)
id  user_status_type_id
================================
1   1
1   0

Result should look like this:

Sample Expected Results
day         count
=================
2012-12-01  1
2012-12-02  0
2012-12-03  4
...
2012-12-31  0

Unfortunately it takes forever to run. What should I do next?

share|improve this question
2  
You showed the expected result - good. But what are you actually getting? –  Daniel Hilgarth Dec 10 '12 at 12:11
    
Or are you getting an error? –  Stefan Dec 10 '12 at 12:14
2  
What's wrong with your query you posted? any errors? not the expected results? or do you want to generate the list of days if there are missing days not filled in the logs table? Please explain more so that we could help you. –  Mahmoud Gamal Dec 10 '12 at 12:22
    
where is this day in your table ?you said select c.day and i dont find day in your calender table –  echo_Me Dec 10 '12 at 13:11
    
Turns out it actually does work, it just took forever so I assumed I was doing something wrong. Obviously I still am since I'm not searching through large datasets. How can I optimize this? Question updated. –  Ryan Dec 10 '12 at 13:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

for your selected columns you don't need any joins. use following sql

SELECT DATE_FORMAT(l.db_timestamp , '%Y-%m-%d') AS days, COUNT(l.id) AS COUNT 
FROM LOG l 
WHERE 
DATE_FORMAT(l.db_timestamp , '%Y-%m-%d') > '2012-12-01' 
AND DATE_FORMAT(l.db_timestamp , '%Y-%m-%d') < '2013-01-01'
GROUP BY days

for user wise count

use

GROUP BY days, l.user_id
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but this won't count days with zero logs. –  Ryan Dec 10 '12 at 15:32
    
@ryan then query can not be optimized in current structure as join columns are in different format. if you can make another column in log table that store only date (Y-m-d) then you can make join and create index on both the joined columns –  dkkumargoyal Dec 11 '12 at 4:51
    
I agree. I ended up using php to generate the zero rows in an array and merging with the MySQL result based on a much simpler query with no joins. Thanks again for your help but I just couldn't make it work in any acceptable time. –  Ryan Dec 11 '12 at 17:54

Try this:: USE DATE() WHILE JOINING

 SELECT
        c.day, COUNT(u.id) AS count
    FROM calendar c
    LEFT JOIN log l
        ON c.day = DATE(l.db_timestamp)
    LEFT JOIN user u
        ON l.user_id = u.id
        AND u.user_status_type_id = 1
    WHERE
        c.day between '2013-01-01'
 AND '2012-12-01'
        GROUP BY
        c.day
share|improve this answer

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