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I'm trying to create a vector with a specific size, of 255 (max).. It doesnt work for me, like I see in examples over the internet...

I'm using Microsoft Visual C++ 2012...

I have the current code :

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <stdlib.h>

using namespace std;

const int MAX = 255;

class test
{
vector <string> Name(MAX);
};

int main()
{
system("PAUSE");
}

It gives me 2 errors :

Error 1 error C2061: syntax error : identifier 'MAX'

2 IntelliSense: variable "MAX" is not a type name

Thanks for your help!

share|improve this question
    
In C++11, you can use vector<string> Name{MAX}; However, this only works in this case for vector because the initializer constructor is not compatible with a type of int for std::string. Put more clearly, with a type of int instead of std::string, the vector will contain 1 element - 256 - rather than 256 default-initialized elements. – chris Dec 10 '12 at 13:03
up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's not valid syntax for a class declaration. Try:

class test
{
   vector <string> Name;
   test() : Name(MAX) {}
};

You can write vector <string> Name(MAX); when you create a variable (in your case, you're declaring a member). For example:

int main()
{
   vector <string> Name(MAX);
}

would be perfectly valid.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you have a space after vector? – Alexander Chertov Dec 10 '12 at 12:49
    
@AlexanderChertov yes. – Luchian Grigore Dec 10 '12 at 12:50
    
Thank you very much! – AmitM9S6 Dec 10 '12 at 13:33

You can't pass arguments to the std::vector constructor int the class declaration. You should put that in the constructor for your class, like this, which utilizes does it via an initializer list:

class test
{
    std::vector<std::string> Name;

    public:

    test():
        Name(MAX)
    {
    }
};
share|improve this answer

You cannot initialize a data member inside the class declaration like this. Use the member initialization list in your constructor of the class to initialize vector<string> Name.

test::test
:Name(MAX)
{
  //
}

Your main would be like this.

test t1 ;

It would automatically call the constructor and all the fields of t1 would be created, including vector<string> Name.

share|improve this answer

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