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Basically a button's tag property is the name of an existing combobox which I need to dynamically reference. It's a generic function to handle multiple buttons. Help

private void SQLButton(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    magic(((Button)sender).Tag.ToString());
}

private void magic(string currentcombo)
{
    string CurrentText = (ComboBox).(currentcombo).Text;
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can set the Tag property to the actual ComboBox and avoid your problem altogether.

//code when defining your button...
{
     sqlButton.Tag = comboBoxA;  //instead of comboBoxA.Name
}

private void SQLButton(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Button button = sender as Button;
    ComboBox comboBox = button.Tag as ComboBox;

    if (comboBox == null ) 
    {...}
    else
    {
        magic(comboBox);
    }
}

private void magic(ComboBox currentcombo)
{
    string CurrentText = currentcombo.Text;
}
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how do I do that?, that seems to be an interesting approach. –  zion Sep 4 '09 at 16:24
    
Tag can be anything. So when you set the Tag of your button to comboBoxA.Name just use comboBoxA instead. –  Austin Salonen Sep 4 '09 at 16:30
    
So I can use comboBoxA.Text and that will retrieve the current contents and pass it on to the method; private void SQLButton(object sender, EventArgs e){ magic(((Button)sender).Tag);} –  zion Sep 4 '09 at 16:36
    
thanks, this.button1.Tag = sourceComboBox.Text; Simple Solution –  zion Sep 4 '09 at 16:48
    
That's code is it, thanks a LOT! –  zion Sep 4 '09 at 18:24

I think I understand what you're after -

You'll want to change your "magic" routine to something like:

private void magic(string currentCombo) {
    ComboBox box = this.Controls.Find(currentCombo) as ComboBox;
    if(box != null) {
        // You can do your "work" here...
        string currentText = box.Text;
    }
}
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Should be a (ComboBox)-cast instead of using as ... you don't want to get a NullRef-exception instead of a Cast-exception –  tanascius Sep 4 '09 at 16:19
    
I prefer this way, personally. I added a null check for you, though. –  Reed Copsey Sep 4 '09 at 16:20
    
Yeah, with null-check I like it more, too :) –  tanascius Sep 4 '09 at 16:21

If you have the string id value of a control then you can use FindControl to get a reference to the control.

Something like ...

Button btn = (Button)FindControl("some_id");
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I don't know if its winforms or asp.net. I am assuming it to be winforms

You could use this.Controls(theNameofTheControl) instead of magic.

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Have a look at the Controls.Find Method, to get the instance of the Control using the name.

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If currentcombo paramter in magic function is the identifier for the control you are going to change then use Page's function FindControl:

string CurrentText = ((ComboBox)FindControl(currentcombo)).Text;

Page.FindControl() method searches the page naming container for a server control with the specified identifier.

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FindControl doest not exist in the curren context? (am I missing a reference? using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.ComponentModel; using System.Data; using System.Drawing; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using System.Windows.Forms; –  zion Sep 4 '09 at 16:40

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