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I'm trying to use Between and OR clause in same SQL statement in SQL Server and every time I'm getting empty result, anyone have an idea about this ? My original SQL is formed like this:

SELECT * 
FROM opportunity AS oppt
WHERE oppt.Location='O/S' 
   OR oppt.Location='Overseas' 
  AND oppt.OPEN_DATE BETWEEN '2014-01-01 00:00:00.000' 
                         AND '2010-01-01 00:00:00.000'
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1  
What is the data type of oppt.OPEN_DATE? –  Mahmoud Gamal Dec 10 '12 at 13:47
    
what's your expected result? –  luchosrock Dec 10 '12 at 13:49
    
Try and use brackets for the two parts with OR: WHERE (oppt.Location='O/S' OR oppt.Location='Overseas') AND oppt.OPEN_DATE ... –  SchmitzIT Dec 10 '12 at 13:50
1  
Be aware that your where clause says that, if Location equals O/S, nothing else matters - this may not be what you want, so after fixing the original issue, you may also need to introduce appropriate parentheses. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 10 '12 at 13:53
    
In addition to other comments about putting the smaller value first, be careful using BETWEEN with datetime values: sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2011/10/19/… –  Pondlife Dec 10 '12 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To add to @RBarryYoung's answer, I'd also recommend putting brackets around your conditions. This makes it explicit, what you intend to be the outcome/how the conditions should be applied.

i.e.

WHERE (oppt.Location='O/S' 
   OR oppt.Location='Overseas')
  AND oppt.OPEN_DATE BETWEEN '2014-01-01 00:00:00.000' 
                         AND '2010-01-01 00:00:00.000'

is different to:

WHERE oppt.Location='O/S' 
   OR (oppt.Location='Overseas'
  AND oppt.OPEN_DATE BETWEEN '2014-01-01 00:00:00.000' 
                         AND '2010-01-01 00:00:00.000')

It's the 2nd of the above that is what you currently have, whereas you probably mean the first.

Read up on Operator Precedence - this tells you in which order, various operators are executed in. In this case AND is applied before OR. But using brackets appropriately to group your conditions helps remove the risk operator precedence having unintended consequences.

I suspect in your case, you are wanting the first of my above examples, which actually you can rationalise down to:

WHERE oppt.Location IN ('O/S', 'Overseas')
      AND oppt.OPEN_DATE BETWEEN '2010-01-01 00:00:00.000' 
                             AND '2014-01-01 00:00:00.000')
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Thanks Ada second solution worked your last suggestion worked perfectly.. cheers –  Jas Dec 10 '12 at 15:20

The BETWEEN predicate requires that the lower value be first and the higher value second, or else you'll get nothing.

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it makes sense. –  luchosrock Dec 10 '12 at 13:50

Try to use () for queries and correct dates in between statement (lower then higher),

In your case it will be:

SELECT * 
FROM opportunity AS oppt
WHERE (oppt.Location='O/S' OR oppt.Location='Overseas')
    AND oppt.OPEN_DATE BETWEEN '2010-01-01' AND '2014-01-01'
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