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Need to take the values from one array, put them through a function and put them in another array. It is meant to be done using a pair of nested for loops. Please help. Complete beginner here.

EDIT: Ok to clarify, I have a 2-d array with various values in it. I want to apply a function to all of these values and have a 2-d array returned with the values after they have gone through the function. I am working in python. Thanks for the quick responses and any help you can give!

EDIT3: Example code:

import numpy as N

def makeGrid(dim):
    ''' Function to return a grid of distances from the centre of an array.
    This version uses loops to fill the array and is thus slow.'''
    tabx = N.arange(dim) - float(dim/2.0) + 0.5
    taby = N.arange(dim) - float(dim/2.0) + 0.5
    grid = N.zeros((dim,dim), dtype='float')
    for y in range(dim):
        for x in range(dim):
            grid[y,x] = N.sqrt(tabx[x]**2 + taby[y]**2)
    return grid

import math

def BigGrid(dim):
    l= float(raw_input('Enter a value for lambda: '))
    p= float(raw_input('Enter a value for phi: '))
    a = makeGrid 
    b= N.zeros ((10,10),dtype=float) #Create an arry to take the returned values
    for i in range(10):
        for j in range (10):
            b[i,j] = a[i][j]*2


if __name__ == "__main__":
    ''' Module test code '''
    size = 10 #Dimension of the array
    newGrid = BigGrid(size)
    newGrid = N.round(newGrid, decimals=2)
    print newGrid
share|improve this question
1  
Two arrays are not the same as a '2d' array. Can you be more specific about what you want to do? Maybe share what you have tried so far? What language you are working in? –  Hunter McMillen Dec 10 '12 at 15:02
    
Pretty vague description I would say –  asprin Dec 10 '12 at 15:04
    
Are your two arrays 2-dimensional? –  RonaldBarzell Dec 10 '12 at 15:05
    
Yes 2 dimensional array. Check out the code in EDIT3. Does that make sense? –  user1887919 Dec 10 '12 at 17:16
    
it gives me the following error 'function' object has no attribute 'getitem' –  user1887919 Dec 10 '12 at 17:17

7 Answers 7

def map_row(row):
    return map(some_function,row)

 map(map_row,my_2d_list)

Is probably how I would do it...

share|improve this answer

Based on your question, it appears you're using Numpy. If you're not too concerned about speed, you can simply call the function with a numpy array; the function will operate on the entire array for you.

There's no need to write the iteration explicitly, though if you can find a way to take advantage of numpy's special features, that will be faster than using a function designed to operate on one element at a time. Unless you're working with a very large dataset, though, this should be fine:

import numpy as np
>>> g = np.array( [ [1,2,3], [ 4,5,6] ] )
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [4, 5, 6]])
>>> def myfunc( myarray ):
...     return 2 * myarray
... 
>>> myfunc(g)
array([[ 2,  4,  6],
       [ 8, 10, 12]])
share|improve this answer
    
I just get TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for *: 'int' and 'function' –  user1887919 Dec 10 '12 at 16:22
    
Are you sure you didn't type "return 2* myfunc" instead? The code snippet and result above is pasted directly from my terminal (using "import numpy as np"), but if the bug is specific to your implementation, we can look into it further. –  abought Dec 10 '12 at 16:42
    
Very sure. I've changed tack slightly but when i try the following code I just get 'function' object has no attribute 'getitem'. New code is EDIT3 –  user1887919 Dec 10 '12 at 17:13

First, you have a bug in your code in the following line:

a = makeGrid

You are setting a to be a function, not an array. You should have the following:

a = makeGrid(dim)

That is why you had the TypeError when you tried the answer by @abought.

Now, to apply an operation element-wise in numpy there are many possibilities. If you want to perform the same operation for every element in the array, the simplest way is to use array operations:

b = a * 2

(Note that you don't need to declare b beforehand. And you also don't need any loops.) Numpy has also many C-optimised functions that perform the same operation on each element of an array. These are called ufuncs. You can combine ufuncs to get complex expressions evaluated element-wise. For example:

b = N.sin(a**2) + N.log(N.abs(a))

Your a array from makeGrid() can also be much more efficiently created using array operations and numpy's mgrid:

grid = N.mgrid[-dim//2 + 1:dim//2:0.5, -dim//2 + 1:dim//2:0.5]
grid = N.sqrt(grid[0]**2 + grid[1]**2)

If you want to perform different operations on each array element, things get more complicated and it may not be possible to avoid loops. For these cases, numpy has a way to decompose loops on a nD array using ndenumerate or ndidex. Your example with ndenumerate:

for index, x in N.ndenumerate(a):
    b[index] = x * 2

This is faster than multiple loops, but the array operations should be used whenever possible.

share|improve this answer

From what I can get in terms of context from the question and what a 2d-array typically means it looks like you are trying to do the following:

>>>> array2d = [[0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]]
>>> def add_two( v ):
...     return v + 2
... 
>>> [ [ add_two( v ) for v in row ] for row in array2d ]
[[2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6]]

The above uses a list comprehension which is the same as using the two nested for loops and in this case more readable and involves less direct interaction of the list methods as you're describing what the list is rather than building it.

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Here is a one-line with double map

map(lambda x:map(func, x), l)

Example:

l=[[1,2,3],[4,3,1]]
map(lambda x:map(lambda x:x*10,x),l)

[[10, 20, 30], [40, 30, 10]]
share|improve this answer

Easy to do it with a nested loop:

def my_function(n): # n will become y from the next part
   new_num = # do whatever you want with it
   return new_num

my_list = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]] # just an example
new_list, final_list = [], [] # multiple assignment
for x in my_list:
   print x
   new_list = []
   for y in x:
      # y is now the first value of the first value of my_list--- 1.
      my_num = my_function(y)
      new_list.append(my_num)
   final_list.append(new_list)
print final_list

That should do it.

Returns: [[2, 3, 4], [5, 6, 7], [8, 9, 10]].

share|improve this answer
for(int i; i < x; i++)
   for(int j; j < y; j++)
       array2[i][j] = func(array2[i][j])

Something like that?

share|improve this answer
    
Ok to clarify i have a 2-d array with various values in it. I want to apply a function to all of these values and have a 2-d array returned with the values after they have gone through the function. I am working in python. Thanks for the quick responses and any help you can give! –  user1887919 Dec 10 '12 at 15:14

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