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SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS * 
FROM (
   SELECT * 
   FROM tbl_substances
   LIMIT 0 , 25
) AS s
LEFT JOIN (
   SELECT subid, list1, list2, list3, list4, list5
   FROM tbl_substances_lists
   WHERE orgid =  '1'
) AS x ON s.subst_id = x.subid
LEFT JOIN (
   SELECT subid, info
   FROM tbl_substances_info
   WHERE orgid =  '1'
) AS y ON s.subst_id = y.subid

The idea is that you have a master list of substances (tbl_substances) then if you have entered any information about them in tbl_substances_lists or tbl_substances_info then that can be displayed too (as long as you are logged in with the right organisation ID)

It's important to show all the substances even if they have no custom information which is why I'm using a LEFT JOIN.

This query works perfectly in phpMyAdmin but when I use it in my database script I get:

You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near ') AS s LEFT JOIN (SELECT subid, list1, list2, list3, list4, list5 FROM tbl_substances_' at line 2

I'm not sure whether the problem is something obvious I'm missing or is it something to do with the fact that this bit of code uses mysql_query which I know is deprecated and old fashioned etc. etc.

I'm not a database expert so if this query looks very ugly to you then I apologise in advance!

EDIT 2

Here's the code for building this query (it gets built dynamically depending on what you're searching for but this is the basic form)

    /*
     * Length
     */

    if ( isset( $_POST['iDisplayStart'] ) && $_POST['iDisplayLength'] != '-1' )
    {
        $sLimit = "LIMIT ".mysql_real_escape_string( $_POST['iDisplayStart'] ).", ".
            mysql_real_escape_string( $_POST['iDisplayLength'] );
    }


    /*
     * Ordering
     */

    $sOrder = "";
    if ( isset( $_POST['iSortCol_0'] ) )
    {
        $sOrder = "ORDER BY  ";
        for ( $i=0 ; $i<intval( $_POST['iSortingCols'] ) ; $i++ )
        {
            if ( $_POST[ 'bSortable_'.intval($_POST['iSortCol_'.$i]) ] == "true" )
            {
                $iColumnIndex = array_search( $_POST['mDataProp_'.$_POST['iSortCol_'.$i]], $aColumns );
                $sOrder .= $aColumns[ $iColumnIndex ]."
                    ".mysql_real_escape_string( $_POST['sSortDir_'.$i] ) .", ";
            }
        }

        $sOrder = substr_replace( $sOrder, "", -2 );
        if ( $sOrder == "ORDER BY" )
        {
            $sOrder = "";
        }
    }

        /*
         * Table info
         */
    $sTable = "tbl_substances ".$sLimit.") AS s LEFT JOIN (SELECT subid, list1, list2, list3, list4, list5 FROM tbl_substances_lists WHERE orgid = '".$orgid."') AS x ON s.subst_id = x.subid LEFT JOIN (SELECT subid, info FROM tbl_substances_info WHERE orgid = '".$orgid."') AS y ON s.subst_id = y.subid";

        $sWhere = "";


    /*
     * SQL queries
     * Get data to display
     */

    $sQuery = "
        SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS * FROM (SELECT * FROM $sTable
                $sWhere
        $sOrder
        $sLimit
    ";

        $rResult = mysql_query( $sQuery ) or die(mysql_error());

Imagine there is nothing in $sWhere and $sOrder at the moment - $sLimit is chosen by the user but in this case it will be LIMIT 0, 25 to get the first 25 records.

This all combines in this case to make the result of echoing out $sQuery:

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS * FROM (SELECT * FROM tbl_substances LIMIT 0, 25) AS s LEFT JOIN (SELECT subid, list1, list2, list3, list4, list5 FROM tbl_substances_lists WHERE orgid = '1') AS x ON s.subst_id = x.subid LEFT JOIN (SELECT subid, info FROM tbl_substances_info WHERE orgid = '1') AS y ON s.subst_id = y.subid
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1  
And/or make a dump of the query as it is finally defined in the database. –  MortenSickel Dec 10 '12 at 15:17
    
I don't know why I'm using nested queries, but they seem to work! It's because I want to present a view to the user of all the substances in the database alongside any information they may have entered. If this isn't the best way, then please tell me. The code generates the SQL query as shown at the start of the question. –  551add Dec 10 '12 at 15:32
    
I don't understand the purpose of using SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS –  Kermit Dec 10 '12 at 16:47
    
@njk This is code someone else has written and I'm adapting for future use - the SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS is there because the data is pulled out into a spreadsheet type table and I run SELECT FOUND_ROWS() later on to see how many results I return and format everything properly. –  551add Dec 10 '12 at 16:51
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2 Answers 2

Haven't analyzed the code, but querywise I see no syntax error. But I'd advise, that you write the query like this:

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS * 
FROM tbl_substances s
LEFT JOIN tbl_substances_lists x ON s.subst_id = x.subid AND x.orgid = '1'
LEFT JOIN tbl_substances_info y ON s.subst_id = y.subid AND y.orgid = '1'
LIMIT 0, 25

Should give the same result.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. I've tried this query, but it's slower than what I was aiming for. I think it's because it joins on the whole substances database (~100,000 records). The reason I was trying to limit on the first query was to speed up the query (for reference, this query takes ~12 seconds to complete; the query at the top of the page takes 0.0063 seconds! –  551add Dec 10 '12 at 17:21
    
You should get the same performance by adding appropriate indexes. 100,000 records is not really much. –  fancyPants Dec 10 '12 at 17:22
    
Thanks, imagine you're dealing with someone very stupid here...where would you suggest are the appropriate indexes? –  551add Dec 10 '12 at 17:28
    
Easiest way to tell is this: Put the EXPLAIN keyword in front of your query and optionally a \G instead of ; at the end. The \G just formats it nicely. Then you can see if and what index is used. Post the result and the results from SHOW CREATE TABLE tbl_substances and the other two tables. Then I can tell you for sure. –  fancyPants Dec 10 '12 at 17:33
    
But I already suspect the columns you are joining on and/or even more likely the orgid columns. –  fancyPants Dec 10 '12 at 17:34
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In my case, I was working with "ISO 8859-1 Characters" (Ç,Ã,é....), doing: utf8_decode($query); solved this problem.

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