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I have a bit of headache in a list of dict.

def funk(x):
    for i in x:
        i['a'] += 1
        print i

list1 = [{'a':1, 'b':2}, {'a':3, 'b':4}]
funk(list1)
print list1

this will output:

{'a': 2, 'b': 2}
{'a': 4, 'b': 4}
[{'a': 2, 'b': 2}, {'a': 4, 'b': 4}]

but i want to have this:

{'a': 2, 'b': 2}
{'a': 4, 'b': 4}
[{'a':1, 'b':2}, {'a':3, 'b':4}]

How do i make list1 stay untouched? eg: [{'a':1, 'b':2}, {'a':3, 'b':4}]

share|improve this question
    
First of all, everything in Python is always pass-by-value. But every value in Python is a pointer to an object. – newacct Dec 10 '12 at 19:36
up vote 4 down vote accepted

funk() could make a copy of x and modify that copy instead of modifying the original x.

import copy

def funk(x):
    x = copy.deepcopy(x)
    for i in x:
        i['a'] += 1
        print i

list1 = [{'a':1, 'b':2}, {'a':3, 'b':4}]
funk(list1)
print list1
share|improve this answer
3  
You should say a deepcopy. Since x is a list holding dicts, a shallow copy isn't going to cut it. – mgilson Dec 10 '12 at 16:57
1  
I haven't tried it, but I HIGHLY doubt that a simple copy of x works here. Whether or not you copy the list, the objects you iterate over in the for loop are exactly the same ... So when you mutate an object, it should still show up. – mgilson Dec 10 '12 at 17:00
    
@NPE -- Perhaps you should try it again ;-). I just tried it and the result I get from the final print list1 is the following: [{'a': 2, 'b': 2}, {'a': 4, 'b': 4}]. Note that the a elements have been incremented. – mgilson Dec 10 '12 at 17:05
    
@mgilson: Already have, you're right. Temporary blindness. Sorry for wasting your time. :) – NPE Dec 10 '12 at 17:05

Obviously, whether or not it's viable depends on the complexity/goal of your operation, but instead of modifying your list in-place, use a list comprehension to create a new one:

def funk(x):
    return [{key: value+1 if key == "a" else value for key, value in i.items()} for i in x]

In your example, you are printing the values, so this wouldn't be useful, but if your intent can be filled by having a new, altered list of dicts, it might be the best route.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it should read value+1 if key == 'a' else value instead of value if key+1 == 'a' .... Otherwise, I support this answer (+1) – mgilson Dec 10 '12 at 17:07
    
@mgilson Indeed, just me not being careful. – Gareth Latty Dec 10 '12 at 17:08

It seems to me that the copy method of a dictionary might help you here:

def funk(x):
    for i in x:
        new_dict = i.copy()
        new_dict['a'] += 1
        print new_dict
share|improve this answer

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