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I want to return a type from a function. For example:

class Super
case class One(a: Int) extends Super
case class Two(b: Float) extends Super
case class Unknown extends Super

def decide(criterion: String): ??? = {
  criterion match {
    case "one" => One
    case "two" => Two
    case _ => Unknown
  }
}

So I want to return the type itself, to store it in a Map so that I could apply it somewhere later:

val test = Buffer(
  ("ahaha" -> "one")
  ("ohoho" -> "two")
  ("lalala" -> "one")
)

var map = scala.collection.mutable.Map[String, Super]()

test.map {pair =>
  map(pair._1) = decide(pair._2)
}

So that later I could like:

def act(code: String) {
  map(code) match {
    case One => doSmth[One]()
    case Two => doSmth[Two]()
    case _ => doNothing()
  }
}

I know that some parts, like the unused parameters of the case classes may seem strange here, but this is how it is in the environment I am working in, and this example is that full because I am not sure if it will differ if I take something away...

So how can I make the decide function return a type and then use it in a manner similar to what I have shown?

share|improve this question
    
You may get java.lang.Class with classOf (e.g. classOf[One]) method so return type of function will be java.lang.Class[Super] –  om-nom-nom Dec 10 '12 at 17:14
    
@om-nom-nom worked the half way. Still I cannot pass the returned type as a type parameter to the doSmth method... –  noncom Dec 10 '12 at 18:00
    
It's not really related to the question of what to return from decide, but why use a map here? Why not instead just pass around the function decide? –  drstevens Dec 10 '12 at 18:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you may want case object One, etc, rather than using Class or ClassTag. Then you get useful match support. For the act method, your case objects could return a ClassTag or similar, or just let act associate One with doSmth[OneClass] etc.

It seems you can make your case companions into case objects. Isn't that special.

package typeswitch
import reflect.runtime.universe._

sealed trait Selection

class Super
case class One(a: Int) extends Super
case object One extends Selection
case class Two(b: Float) extends Super
case object Two extends Selection
case class Unknown() extends Super
case object Unknown extends Selection

object Test extends App {
  type What = Selection

  def decide(criterion: String): What = criterion match {
    case "one" => One
    case "two" => Two
    case _ => Unknown
  }

  val test = List(
    "ahaha" -> "one",
    "ohoho" -> "two",
    "lalala" -> "one"
  )

  val m = scala.collection.mutable.Map[String, What]()

  test map (pair => m(pair._1) = decide(pair._2))

  def act(code: String) = m(code) match {
    case One => doSmth[One]()
    // non-exhaustive
    //case Two => doSmth[Two]()
    case Unknown => doNothing()
    // handle exhaustively
    case s: Selection => doSmthNew(s)
  }
  def doSmthElse[A <: Super]()(implicit t: TypeTag[A]): A = {
    Console println s"Do st with $t"
    val claas: Class[_] = t.mirror.runtimeClass(t.tpe)
    null.asInstanceOf[A]
  }
  def doSmth[A <: Super]()(implicit t: ClassTag[A]): A = {
    Console println s"Do st with $t"
    val claas: Class[_] = t.runtimeClass
    null.asInstanceOf[A]
  }
  def doSmthNew[A >: What : ClassTag, B <: Super](what: A): B = {
    Console println s"Do st new with $what"
    null.asInstanceOf[B]
  }
  def doNothing() { }

  val res = act("lalala")
  Console println s"Got $res?"
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, a nice try, I was thinking of something similar.. but this actually, is a fallback - the solution supposes no direct usage of the type itself - it uses companion objects which, in this case, is not much different from using named integer constants.. However, I can't think of anything better here... maybe JVM won't let us do what I need..... –  noncom Dec 10 '12 at 18:06
1  
The word you're looking for is "nifty." It's not named constants because you get exhaustive checks on match, and it's easy to get the companion class by reflection. You don't show what you want to do in doSmth. –  som-snytt Dec 10 '12 at 18:17
    
Now I see! Right, probably this is the best.. –  noncom Dec 10 '12 at 18:20
1  
@noncom I think you're probably right. From your previous comment, I guess you don't know what you're supposed to do with a TypeTag? You can get your Class back from TypeTag or ClassTag; I'll edit. Also, Selection[A <: Super] would make it simply to navigate to what you're selecting. –  som-snytt Dec 22 '12 at 0:37
    
Thanks! Turns out TypeTag is the replacement for Manifest.. and I was never a pro there, but I have studied the topic after reading that your post! Everything is very nice indeed ) –  noncom Dec 22 '12 at 13:04

Sorry if this is too basic, but:

$ scala
Welcome to Scala version 2.10.0-RC2 (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.7.0_06).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> trait Bar
defined trait Bar

scala> case class Foo(i:Int) extends Bar
defined class Foo

scala> import reflect.runtime.universe._
import reflect.runtime.universe._

scala> def f[A <: Bar : TypeTag]() = println(s" Do ${ implicitly[TypeTag[A]] }") 
f: [A <: Bar]()(implicit evidence$1: reflect.runtime.universe.TypeTag[A])Unit

scala> f[Foo]
 Do TypeTag[Foo]
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, this is not basic for me, I will study this, thank you! –  noncom Dec 10 '12 at 18:19

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