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does this do what I think it does? I seems to me that yes, I am asking to be sure..

if n[i] == n[i+1] == n[i+2]:
    return True

is it equal to:

if n[i] == n[i+1] and n[i+1] == n[i+2]:
    return True

?

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2  
That is correct. –  Diego Basch Dec 10 '12 at 17:28
    
Duplicate of: stackoverflow.com/questions/13792604/… –  F3AR3DLEGEND Dec 10 '12 at 18:09
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is equivalent to but not equal to, since accesses are only performed once. Python chains relational operators naturally (including in and is).

The easiest way to show the slight difference:

>>> print(1) == print(2) == print(3)
1
2
3
True
>>> print(1) == print(2) and print(2) == print(3)
1
2
2
3
True
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2  
It's worth noting they are not the same, as it is possible to contrive a scenario where one works and the other fails (n is an object that changes the value of n[i+1] after an access). Edit: I have edited in an example to show the difference. –  Lattyware Dec 10 '12 at 17:33
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yes you are correct ....

you can also do

5 > x > 1

or

1 < x < 5
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Yes, however, when the comparisons are chained the common expression is evaluated once, when using and it's evaluated twice. In both cases the second comparison is not evaluated if the first one is false, example from the docs:

Comparisons can be chained arbitrarily, e.g., x < y <= z is equivalent to x < y and y <= z, except that y is evaluated only once (but in both cases z is not evaluated at all when x < y is found to be false).

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Yep, at the python's internals the comparison operators returns nor true neither false, they instead return the 'comparison result' object (cannot remember the class name, it was quite in past), and this object provides the _lt_, _gt_, _eq_ etc etc methods and become 'responsible' for the final result (and the 'comparison result' is casting to True or False at end of statement). That's a magic of semantic control python provides to you :)

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I did not initially think this would work, but testing it myself, yes, it appears to do what you think it does.

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