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I am reading the Algorithm Design Manual Second Edition and this is from an exercise question. Quoting the question

A common problem for compilers and text editors is determining whether the parentheses in a string are balanced and properly nested. For example, the string ((())())() contains properly nested pairs of parentheses, which the strings )()( and ()) do not. Give an algorithm that returns true if a string contains properly nested and balanced parentheses, and false if otherwise. For full credit, identify the position of the first offending parenthesis if the string is not properly nested and balanced.

Question is under stacks,queues and lists category. Here is what I wrote in C#.

const char LeftParenthesis = '(';
const char RightParenthesis = ')';
bool AreParenthesesBalanced(string str, out int errorAt)
{
    var items = new Stack<int>(str.Length);
    errorAt = -1;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
    {
        char c = str[i];
        if (c == LeftParenthesis)
            items.Push(i);
        else if (c == RightParenthesis)
        {
            if (items.Count == 0)
            {
                errorAt = i + 1;
                return false;
            }
            items.Pop();
        }
    }
    if (items.Count > 0)
    {
        errorAt = items.Peek() + 1;
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

This works well. But I am not sure that this is the right method to approach this problem. Any better ideas are welcome.

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1  
Might check out refactormycode.com, which is more geared toward this sort of thing. –  Larsenal Sep 4 '09 at 17:41
2  
Yes this is quite right way and is also used to parse mathematical expression. –  TheVillageIdiot Sep 4 '09 at 17:42

9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think this is the intention, but really you just need to decrement and increment a counter if you are only dealing with parenthesis. If you are dealing with the pairings of square brackets, angle brackets, curly braces or whatever character pairing you'd like to use, you'll need a stack like you have done.

You can also use a list, pulling the head element off and on, but really a stack is probably implemented as a list anyway --at least it is in ocaml.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. In this case, simple implementation would be to increment and decrement a variable. But the requirement is to use any of the data structures. Thanks for the help. –  Appu Sep 4 '09 at 17:48
3  
A naive counter implementation would check only that the value is zero at the end. To answer this question, you would need to immediately fail if it goes negative and also identify the first excess open if it ends up positive. I don't think this will be any easier than the algorithm shown by Appu. As for data structures, it's going to be a stack, whether it's implemented as a linked list or not. In fact, it would work fine implemented over an array that's as large as the string. Or, in the recursive example, we use the real stack. –  Steven Sudit Sep 4 '09 at 17:52
    
@Appu: It fails the second part, of identifying the offending parenthesis. –  Steven Sudit Sep 4 '09 at 17:53
1  
@Steven: It finds the first offending parenthesis index and assign to errorAt variable. –  Appu Sep 4 '09 at 17:56
    
@Steven: The chapter isn't about recursion that's why I didn't bring it up. Also, strings are arrays here, and you get no advantage from recursion since you'd be carrying around a counter to access the string elements. –  nlucaroni Sep 4 '09 at 18:10
    static public bool CheckForBalancedBracketing(string IncomingString)
    {
    /*******************************************************************
     * The easiest way to check for balanced bracketing is to start    *
     * counting left to right adding one for each opening bracket, '(' *
     * and subtracting 1 for every closing bracket, ')'.  At the end   *
     * the sum total should be zero and at no time should the count    *
     * fall below zero.                                                *
     *                                                                 *
     * Implementation:  The bracket counting variable is an unsigned   *
     * integer and we trap an overflow exception.  This happens if the *
     * unsigned variable ever goes negative.  This allows us to abort  *
     * at the very first imbalance rather than wasting time checking   *
     * the rest of the characters in the string.                       *
     *                                                                 *
     * At the end all we have to do is check to see if the count       *
     * is equal to zero for a "balanced" result.                       *
     *                                                                 *
     *******************************************************************/
        const char LeftParenthesis = '(';
        const char RightParenthesis = ')';
        uint BracketCount = 0;

        try
        {
            checked  // Turns on overflow checking.
            {
                for (int Index = 0; Index < IncomingString.Length; Index++)
                {
                    switch (IncomingString[Index])
                    {
                        case LeftParenthesis:
                            BracketCount++;
                            continue;
                        case RightParenthesis:
                            BracketCount--;
                            continue;
                        default:
                            continue;
                    }  // end of switch()

                }
            }
        }

        catch (OverflowException)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (BracketCount == 0)
        {
            return true;
        }

        return false;

    }  // end of CheckForBalancedBracketing()
share|improve this answer
  1. Remove all non-'(' and -')' characters from an input string. This gives you a string of '(' and ')' only.

  2. If the string has odd length, return false.

  3. Else, start reading along our string, adding +1 to a "signature" for each '(' and -1 for each ')'; if this signature is ever negative, return false.

  4. Return true.

share|improve this answer
using System;
class Solution
{
    public int solution(string S)
    {
        int x1 = 0;
        int x2 = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < S.Length; i++)
        {
            if (S[i] == ')')
                if (x1 <= 0) return 0;
                else x1--;
            else if (S[i] == '(')
                x1++;
        }
        if (x1 == 0)
            return 1;
        else
            return 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

As TheVillageIdiot said, it's fine. You could also implement it recursively, which might be more elegant, or might not. Finally, you might want to require that matching parentheses contain something valid between them, so as to allow "(a)" but not "()".

share|improve this answer
    
This answer has had 2 downvotes with 0 explanations. I sense an imbalance. So if you have a reason for your downvote, I suggest you share it. –  Steven Sudit Sep 4 '09 at 18:46

Why have a return value and an out parameter that give the same information?

You could return an int: -1 = balanced, otherwise the index of the error.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about it. But some how I felt this pattern is better suited here. Thanks for the help. –  Appu Sep 4 '09 at 17:53
    
@Bill: You would want to call the method FindInvalidParenthesis, then. Then it would make sense for it to return -1 on failure, and the index on success. Having said that, this Try* interface, which returns a success flag while passing the actual value as an out parameter is in many ways cleaner. –  Steven Sudit Sep 4 '09 at 18:43
    
That's a good point, a name-change would be in order under this suggestion. But having to set two values and check two values instead of one to determine the result of the function? I'm afraid I don't see how that is cleaner. –  Bill Sep 4 '09 at 19:37
int i;
int len; 
char popped;
stack<char> st;
string a = "({<<";
len = a.length();

for(i=0;i<len;i++)
{
    if(a[i] == '<' || a[i] == '(' || a[i] == '[' || a[i] == '{')
    {
        st.push(a[i]); 
        continue;
    }
    if(a[i] == '>' || a[i] == ')' || a[i] == ']' || a[i] == '}')
    {
        if(st.empty())
        {
            cout << "stack is empty, when popped , not balanced" << endl;
            return 0;
        }
        else
        {
            popped = st.top(); 
            st.pop();
            if (!((a[i] == '>' && popped == '<') || (a[i] == ')' && popped == '(') || (a[i] == '}' && popped == '{') || (a[i] == '>' && popped == '<'))) //ok
            {
                cout << "not balanced on character" + std::string(1,a[i]) << endl;
                return 0;
            }
        }

    }

}
if(st.empty())
{
    cout << "balanced" << endl;
}
else
{
    cout << "not balanced stack not empty" << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
Checking balanced parentheses
package parancheck;

import java.util.EmptyStackException;
import java.util.Stack;

public class ParnCheck 
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        int pu = 0;
        int po = 0;
        String str = "()())";
        System.out.println(str); 
        Stack st = new Stack();
       for(int i=0; i<str.length();i++)
       {
        if(str.charAt(i)=='(')
        {
           doPush(st, str.charAt(i));
           pu++;
         }
        else 
        {
             try
              {
                doPop(st);
              }
             catch(EmptyStackException e)
              {
                System.out.println("");
              }
              po++;
        }
     }


       if(pu == po)
       {
           System.out.println("Correct");
       }
       else
       {
           System.out.println("Wrong");
       }

    }
    static void doPush(Stack st,char ch)
    {
        st.push(ch);
    }
    static void doPop(Stack st)
    {
        char c = (char)st.pop();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
import java.util.Stack;

public class CheckBalancedParenthesis {

    public static void main (String args[]){
        CheckBalancedParenthesis checker = new CheckBalancedParenthesis();
        System.out.println(checker.checkBalancedParenthesis("{}}{}{}{}{}"));
    }

    public boolean checkBalancedParenthesis(String pattern){
        Stack stack = new Stack();
        for(int i = 0; i < pattern.length();i++){
            char c = pattern.charAt(i);
            if(c == '{'){
                stack.push(c);
            }else if (c == '}'){
                if(!stack.isEmpty()){
                    stack.pop();
                } else{
                    System.out.println("Error at - " + i);
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
        return stack.isEmpty();
    }
}
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