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I have following string:

>>>sentence='No, I shouldn't be glad, YOU should be glad.'

And what I want is to make a dictionary with a word of the sentence as key, and the next word as value.

>>>dict(sentence)
{('No,'): ['I'], ('I'): ['shouldn't'], ('shouldn't'): ['be'], ('be'): ['glad,', 'glad.'], ('glad,'): ['YOU'], ('YOU'): ['should'], ('should'): ['be']} 
                                                                 ^        ^       ^             
                                                                 |        |       |

As you can see if a word occurs multiples times in a sentence, it gets multiple values. If it's the last word it will not be added to the dictionary. 'glad' doesn't get multiple values because the word ends with a ',' or '.' which makes it a different string.

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1  
so what's the expected ouput here? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Dec 10 '12 at 18:11
    
Great, what have you tried? What problems have you encountered ? –  lqc Dec 10 '12 at 18:18
1  
Comedy one line answer: print (lambda words: {key: value for key, value in {word:[nextWord for curWord, nextWord in zip(words, words[1:]) if curWord == word] for word in set(words)}.iteritems() if len(value) > 0})("No, I shouldn't be glad, YOU should be glad.".split()) (Use only in case of worldwide newline shortage crisis) –  Kevin Dec 10 '12 at 18:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
import collections

sentence = "No, I shouldn't be glad, YOU should be glad."

d = collections.defaultdict(list)
words = sentence.split()
for k, v in zip(words[:-1], words[1:]):
   d[k].append(v)
print(d)

This produces

defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {'No,': ['I'], 'be': ['glad,', 'glad.'], 'glad,': ['YOU'], 'I': ["shouldn't"], 'should': ['be'], "shouldn't": ['be'], 'YOU': ['should']})
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And afterwards, if you set d.default_factory to None, you'll have regular dictionary behavior in most other circumstances :) –  mgilson Dec 10 '12 at 18:14
    
My problem is part of a more sophisticated program, is it possible to change the type so I don't have following problem: 'TypeError: expected {(<class 'str'>, <class 'str'>, <class 'str'>): [<class 'str'>]}' –  user1830011 Dec 10 '12 at 22:40
    
@user1830011: What's the code that's giving you this error? –  NPE Dec 10 '12 at 22:41
    
Problem solved. All i needed to do was: plain_dict = dict(d) Thanks for the method! –  user1830011 Dec 10 '12 at 23:11

using dict.setdefault():

In [9]: strs="No, I shouldn't be glad, YOU should be glad."


In [19]: dic={}

In [20]: for x,y in zip(words,words[1:]):
      dic.setdefault(x,[]).append(y)     
   ....:     

In [21]: dic
Out[21]: 
{'I': ["shouldn't"],
 'No,': ['I'],
 'YOU': ['should'],
 'be': ['glad,', 'glad.'],
 'glad,': ['YOU'],
 'should': ['be'],
 "shouldn't": ['be']}
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He wants the punctuation. –  ajon Dec 10 '12 at 18:24

This isn't tested but should be close.

words = sentence.split()
sentenceDict = {}
for index in xrange(len(words)-1):
    if words[index] in sentenceDict:
        sentenceDict[words[index].append(words[index+1])
    else
        sentenceDict[words[index]] = [words[index+1]]
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It should work, but all that code duplication is not so nice, especially since there is such a nice .setdefault() method readily available. –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 10 '12 at 18:16
import collections

sentence = "No, I shouldn't be glad, YOU should be glad."

d = collections.defaultdict(list)
words = sentence.split()
for k, v in zip(words[:-1], words[1:]):
   d[k].append(v)
print(d)

This produces

defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {'No,': ['I'], 'be': ['glad,', 'glad.'], 'glad,': ['YOU'], 'I': ["shouldn't"], 'should': ['be'], "shouldn't": ['be'], 'YOU': ['should']})

@NLS: I just wanted to add something on this. "d = collections.defaultdict(list)", like the dict object does not retain the order of the words so if we have to retain the order of the sentence we might have to use tuple.

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If the order is not important, just another way to do it

sentence="No, I shouldn't be glad, YOU should be glad."
#Split the string into words
sentence = sentence.split()
#Create pairs of consecutive words
sentence = zip(sentence,sentence[1:])
from itertools import groupby
from operator import itemgetter
#group the sorted pairs based on the key
sentence = groupby(sorted(sentence, key = itemgetter(0)), key = itemgetter(0))
#finally create a dictionary of the groups
{k:[v for _,v in  g] for k, g in sentence}
{'No,': ['I'], 'be': ['glad,', 'glad.'], 'glad,': ['YOU'], 'I': ["shouldn't"], 'should': ['be'], "shouldn't": ['be'], 'YOU': ['should']}
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