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I am really struggling here to get to grips with writing asynchronous JavaScript. Could you please provide an example of a simple JavaScript function which is asynchronous written in plain JavaScript (and not using Node.js or JQuery)

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closed as not constructive by gpojd, Aziz Shaikh, AlphaMale, Jean-François Corbett, hims056 Dec 11 '12 at 8:05

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2  
setTimeout??? –  Bergi Dec 10 '12 at 18:14
1  
Event handlers. –  Šime Vidas Dec 10 '12 at 18:15
    
@SLaks read Bergi's answer. That's basically what I am referring to. –  ryan Dec 10 '12 at 18:24
1  
@ryan: But asynchrony has nothing to do with single-threaded-ness. Aside from Web Workers (obviously), all Javascript asynchrony is still single-threaded. –  SLaks Dec 10 '12 at 18:27
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Thanks for the comments guys but why the vote down of my question? - its these type of confusions about async I wanted to clear up for myself and others. –  jasdeepkhalsa Dec 10 '12 at 18:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

JavaScript itself is synchronous and single-threaded. You cannot write an asynchronous function; plain JS has no timing API. There will be no side-effects from parallel threads.

What you can do is use some APIs provided by your environment (Node.js, Webbrowser) that allow you to schedule asynchronous tasks - using timeouts, ajax, FileAPI, requestAnimationFrame, nextTick, WebWorkers, DOM events, whatever.

An example using setTimeout (provided by the HTML Timing API):

window.setTimeout(function() {
    console.log("World");
}, 1000);
console.log("Hello");
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1  
Good answer, but was an example using bind really necessary? Might confuse the OP even more... –  bfavaretto Dec 10 '12 at 18:28
    
+1, very true; 'async' tasks are just the ones shifted in the execution queue. Hence the (sometimes) useful trick with setTimeout(func, 0). ) –  raina77ow Dec 10 '12 at 18:28
    
@bfavaretto: Didn't want to repeat Xeano's answer. Changed now to reduce confusion :-) –  Bergi Dec 10 '12 at 18:31
1  
I thought async was less about timing and more about running a function or set of functions as a kind of background task so that the JavaScript interpreter need not wait to run the next function. Or in other words, running functions in parallel rather than in a series. Is that true? –  jasdeepkhalsa Dec 10 '12 at 18:50
2  
@jasdeepkhalsa: No, the javascript itself does not run in parallel - it's always single-threaded (WebWorkers being the workaround). What happens in background is the waiting, the file access, the HTTP request etc. –  Bergi Dec 10 '12 at 19:02

This is asynchronous:

setTimeout(function(){
   console.log('1');
}, 2000);

console.log('2');

2 will be written to the console before 1. Because setTimeout is async.

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Here's one very simple example:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
  window.setTimeout(function() {
    console.log(i);
  }, 2000);
}

You might expect these console.log() calls to show you 0, 1, 2 etc., as in this snippet:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
  console.log(i);
}

But in fact only 10s will be printed! The reason that functions passed into setTimeout function (as its 'callback' argument) will be invoked after for loop is completed - i.e., after i value is set to 10.

Yet you should understood one thing: all JavaScript in a browser executes on a single thread; asynchronous events (such as mouse clicks and timers) are only run when there's been an opening in the execution queue. Here's a brilliant article written by John Resig on this topic.

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3  
The problem with the loop is a scoping issue, not because of it's asynchronous nature. If they were scoped correctly, the loop would work as expected. Although it's a good explanation of the functions passed to setTimout executing after the for loop –  Ian Dec 10 '12 at 18:33

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