Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There's a fine question on overriding inherited attributes of properties.

Suppose an attribute:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.All, Inherited = true)]
public class MyAttributeAttribute : Attribute

//...

public class ParentClass
{
    [MyAttribute]
    public String MyString;
}

public class ChildClass : ParentClass
{
    new public String MyString; //Doesn't have MyAttribute
}

But what if MyAttribute is set to a class?

[MyAttribute]
public class ParentClass

public class ChildClass; //Don't want MyAttribute

Is there a way to make ChildClass not inherit the attribute?


Context: Purely theoretical. I want to make an attribute inheritable and want to know, if the case happens some day, if I can override it.

share|improve this question
    
Well, your first example is declaring a new member altogether that has no relation to ParentClass.MyString; there is no overriding and naturally attributes wouldn't be shared. I know with reflection, you can get attributes either declared specifically to the target type or flattened to include all attributes from any inherited classes. –  Chris Sinclair Dec 10 '12 at 18:34
    
@ChrisSinclair You are right. My wording is incorrect. –  MPelletier Dec 10 '12 at 20:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could copy the BrowsableAttribute approach mentioned in one of the answers to the question you reference. You can make a constructor with a boolean that when set to false will denote that the attribute, although present, should not be handled. You can also add a parameterless constructor that set the property to true. This is the one that you will use most often unless you decide to override the attribute inherited from a base class.

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.All, Inherited = true)]
public class MyAttributeAttribute : Attribute
{
    public bool Enabled { get; private set; }

    public MyAttributeAttribute()
        :this(true)
    {
    }

    public MyAttributeAttribute(bool enabled)
    {
        Enabled = enabled;
    }
}

Then when you reflect on your types and look for the attribute, you can check on the Enabled property and only if it is true you actually use it.

Your example class hierarchy will then be:

[MyAttribute]
public class ParentClass
[MyAttribute(false)]    
public class ChildClass; //Don't want MyAttribute
share|improve this answer
    
+1 It's an interesting solution, but it requires more work by whatever consumes the class and applies reflection to it. If there was a way to simply rip the attribute out or mask it... –  MPelletier Dec 11 '12 at 16:29
1  
@MPelletier Of course, this is a tradeoff. If you could isolate the reflection in a dedicated class or even better in a base class you would only have to do this once though. Another approach would be to create another attribute that specifies the opposite. Like the NonSerializedAttribute that informs the serializers that a specific field of a serializable class should not be serialized. This approach also needs extra work though. –  Panos Rontogiannis Dec 11 '12 at 16:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.