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I saw this on twitter and I couldn't explain it either. Defining a onload function in the following two manner works:

1) JSFiddle

<html>
    <head>
        <script>
            onload = function(){
                alert('this works');
            };
        </script>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>​

2) JSFiddle

<html>
    <head>
        <script>
            window.onload = function(){
                alert('this works');
            };
        </script>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>​

But when defined like the following, it doesn't work even though it is assigned to window.onload

3) JSFiddle

<html>
    <head>
        <script>
            function onload(){
                alert('this doesnt work');
            };
            alert(window.onload); // this shows the definition of above function
        </script>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>​

What's going on here?

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1  
Your question really intrigued me, and I'm doing some research. I'm not sure it's because of hoisting as dystroy said. It might be related to the way browsers deal with event handlers, but I'm also not sure of that... –  bfavaretto Dec 10 '12 at 21:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The first two examples assign a function to the window.onload property (window. is implicit in the first example). The onload property actually belongs to the prototype of window (conveniently called Window).

The third variant declares a new local function with the same name, and that function shadows the property from the prototype. This means, when you ask for window.onload, the engine finds the local version first, and gives up looking up the prototype chain. So alert(window.onload); does alert your function source. However, for the event handler to work, it would have to be assigned to the prototype object's onload property.

However, there is something odd going on: when you try to assign to a property that's inherited from the prototype, it shouldn't work, and an "own" property should be created on the object, shadowing the one from the prototype (e.g. http://jsfiddle.net/ssBt9/). But window behaves differently (http://jsfiddle.net/asHP7/), and the behavior may even vary depending on the browser.

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What does shadow mean, is it a technical term? I can't wrap my head around why it doesn't execute when it still can be referenced from window.onload. Can you add more explanation? –  Ashfame Dec 10 '12 at 18:37
1  
    
May as well add that functions declared in the global scope become properties of the window object, but it still shadows the original window's onload property. jsfiddle.net/Ad7JG/1 –  Fabrício Matté Dec 10 '12 at 18:52
    
Turns out my answer was sort of correct. But I had to ask a separate question to realize that. –  bfavaretto Dec 10 '12 at 22:56
    
Thanks! That helps :) –  Ashfame Dec 11 '12 at 7:44

That's because onload is already declared and null before your script executes.

This is similar to that code :

var v=null;
function v(){
    console.log('hi');
}​​​​
console.log(v); // alerts null

which is different from this one :

function v(){
    console.log('hi');
}​​​​
console.log(v); // alerts the function

When you declare a function like this, the declaration and assignment are logically hoisted to the "start" of the scope, so the assignment doesn't really occur after the onload function is given the null value.

That's why it's different from

window.onload=...

which isn't a declaration but only an assignment which can't be hoisted.

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I'm still a little confused about this. So you're saying there's something like an implicit var onload = null that overwrites the hoisted function declaration? –  bfavaretto Dec 10 '12 at 21:06
    
Yes, the window object is initialized before you run your script. You can type this in the console : console.log(window, window.onload) –  dystroy Dec 11 '12 at 7:15

In the first two cases your are defining a member of window called onload. In the third case your are only defining a function but is not a member of current window.

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