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It's a lot of code I have but here's the relevant bits I think.

I have an array I made of size 10 as a stub, I DO NOT KNOW in advance what size array I might get, only that it cannot be bigger than ten.

    int[] arrTracker = new int[10];
    arrTracker = MyLibrary.SearchForABookISBN( true, AShelf, userParsedArr, aUserTitle );

    for ( int j = 0; j < 10; j++)
    {
        pln(AShelf[arrTracker[j]]);

    }

In the above code in theory once I have my array I loop through it and display the contents (which will be basically where in the MyLibrary object array have I found the book I am searching for.

"userParsedArr" is the user entered ISBN.

public int[] SearchForABookISBN ( boolean aFlag, Book[] anArray, int[] AnISBN, String aTitle ) 
{
    //This one was difficult.

        int length = anArray.length;
        int[] AnotherArr = new int[0];
        int[] AnotherArrTemp = new int[0];
        int[] AnotherArrNew = new int[0];

        boolean UFoundMe = false;

        if ( aFlag == true )
        {
            for ( int i = 0; i < length; i++)
            {
                //Assume we find the ISBN


                if ( ( anArray[i].Title.equals(aTitle) ) )
                {
                    int counter = 0;
                    for ( int j = 0;  j < 9; j++)
                    {
                        if (anArray[i].ISBN[j] == AnISBN[j])
                        {
                            counter++;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            UFoundMe = false;
                            break;
                        }
                        if ( counter == 9 )
                        {
                            UFoundMe = true;
                        }

                    }
                    if ( UFoundMe == true )
                    {

                        //Create our 'main' tracker at 1 + size of previous array.
                        AnotherArrNew = new int[1 + AnotherArr.length];
                        if ( AnotherArrTemp.length > 0 )
                        {
                            //Copy values into a temp array.
                            //Make a new temp array
                            for ( int m = 0; m < AnotherArr.length - 1; m++ )
                            {
                                AnotherArrNew[m] = AnotherArrTemp[m];
                            }       
                        }           
                        AnotherArrNew[(AnotherArrNew.length) - 1] = i;

                        AnotherArrTemp = new int[AnotherArrNew.length]; 
                        for ( int n = 0; n < AnotherArr.length; n++ )
                        {
                            AnotherArrTemp[n] = AnotherArrNew[n];
                        }                           

                        System.out.println(anArray[i]);
                    }

                }
            }
        }
        return AnotherArrNew;
  }
}

Basic idea here is that I create some blank arrays, and then once I find a book I create a new array one size larger and toss out the old array, transfer contents to a temp array and then carefully make a backup of what I made before deleting the old new array to make it bigger.

So presumably say I have 10 books, and 3 of them have the same title and ISBN. I expect to return an array of 3, but I don't know that in advance because what if I'm given 20 books and all of them are the same?

Would MyLibrary.SearchForABookISBN( true, AShelf, userParsedArr, aUserTitle ).length work to let me know the size of the array I'm getting in advance? So just declare:

int aLength = MyLibrary.SearchForABookISBN( true, AShelf, userParsedArr, aUserTitle ).length
int[] arrTracker = new int[aLength];
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1  
If you don't know the size in advance, use ArrayList. You can convert it to an array, if you have to. –  jlordo Dec 10 '12 at 18:34
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2 Answers

As jlordo proposes: simply use ArrayList<Integer> instead of int[]. It implements the List<T> interface, so you've got methods like add(T element), remove(T Element), remove(int index) and probably contains(T element).

ArrayList will actually be backed by an array which gets resized once its capacity has been used up, but you don't need to know about that to use it ;)

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Your profile picture.... yikes! –  Lews Therin Dec 10 '12 at 18:40
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Use the power of Java collections for faster and more maintainable code. Add ISBN to your Book:

class Book {
  private String isbn;
  private String title;
  public Book(int isbn, String title) {
    this.isbn = isbn;
    this.title = title;
  }
  @Override
  public String toString() {
    return "Book [isbn=" + isbn + ", title=" + title + "]";
  }     
}

If you can reorganize you array of books into a Map, you can lookup by title in constant time. As an additional benifit, the code is more readable and maintainable with none of that array copying:

private static List<Book> search(Map<String, List<Book>> library, String title) { 
  return library.get(title); 
}  

Here's how you might use it:

import static java.util.Arrays.asList;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Map<String, List<Book>> library = new HashMap<>();
    library.put("a", asList(new Book("1", "a"), new Book("2", "a"))); 
    library.put("c", asList(new Book("3", "c")));
    System.out.println(search(library, "a"));
}

This new HashMap<>() bit is Java 7 code which I thought might be fun to try. Use HashMap<String, List<Book>> for previous versions.

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I never got int ISBN to work for 9 digits, neither did long work and implementing BigInt was also problematic though, which is why I turned it into an array. –  RaenirSalazar Dec 10 '12 at 21:17
    
A string should do the trick. –  yakshaver Dec 10 '12 at 21:39
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