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I'm creating a site where the user should be able to change the order of navigation items. However, the navigation items are dynamically loaded from different sources and I do not know how many navigation items there are nor what items I can expect. All I know is that I have multiple files like this:

return array(
    array('Google', 'http://www.google.com'),
    array('StackOverflow', 'http://www.stackoverflow.com',
        array(
            array('Contact', 'contact.html'),
            array('Test', 'test.html')
        )
    ),
    array('Home', 'index.html')
);

As you can see this is a tree of menu items, with sub-items that can be any layer deep. All these arrays have to be combined into one navigation menu, and the files can change quite often. Clearly, this is not hard if the items do not have to be user-sortable. But with that functionality, I just can't come up with an efficient solution. Especially since I do not want to have the business logic and presentation mixed.

Currently, I have the following code (slightly simplified):

Controller:

$view = new \View('navigation.html');
$navigation = new mappers\Navigation();
$view->items = $navigation->fetchAll();

mapper\Navigation:

class Navigation {
    private $type;

    // Create a tree from:
    // $items: array(title, url, children); title = string; url = array / null / string; children = array / null
    // $order: url => array(position, children); position = integer; children = array / null
    // Pass $order by reference so that found items can be added
    private function buildTree($items, &$order) {
        $tree = array();

        foreach ($items as $item) {
            $uri = $item[1];

            // Get order
            if (isset($order[$uri])) {
                $position = $order[$uri][0];
                $childrenOrder = $order[$uri][1];
            } else {
                $order[$uri] = array(count($order), array()); // Create the item for this uri

                $position = $order[$uri][0];
                $childrenOrder = $order[$uri][1];
            }

            // Get children tree if specified
            if (isset($item[2])) {
                $children = $this->buildTree($item[2], $childrenOrder);
            } else {
                $children = null;
            }

            $tree[$position] = array($item[0], $uri, $children);
        }
        ksort($tree);   

        return $tree;
    }

    public function fetchAll() {
        $items = array();

        foreach (new \FilesystemIterator('navigation', \FilesystemIterator::SKIP_DOTS) as $file) {
            if ($file->isDir()) { // Ignore everything which isn't a directory
                $array = new \PersistentArray($file->getPathname() . '/items.php');
                foreach ($array as $item) {
                    $items[] = $item;
                }
            }
        }

        // Load the order settings
        $order = new \PersistentArray('order.php');

        // Build a tree of all navigation items in the right order
        $tree = $this->buildTree($items, $order);

        Save the order settings (have been changed, since $order is passed by reference)
        $order->save();

        return $tree;
    }
}

navigation.html:

$echo = '';
$echo = function($item) use($echo) { // Use a closure, in order not to pollute the global namespace
    printf('<li><a href="%s">%s</a>', $item[1], $item[0]);
    if (!empty($item[2])) {
        printf('<ul>%s</ul>', $echo($item[2]));
    }
    echo '</li>';
}

?>

<ul>
    <?php foreach ($items as $item) {
        $echo($item);
    } ?>
</ul>

In this code PersistentArray is a simple class that loads an array from a file. Objects of this class are accessible like any array. They also provide a method save() which writes the array to a file. This file can later on be opened again using this class.

The above code works, but it does so in a way that looks pretty inefficient to me. I have four loops in this code! Not to mention that the reference and the closure are pretty "hacky". But I haven't been able to come up with a better way to solve this problem.

So my question is: can you come up with a better way to do this? Are there often-used methods? Thanks on forehand!


An example of a saved order array is:

return array(
    'index.html' => array(
        0 => 0,
        1 => array(
            'page1.html' => array(
                0 => 0,
                1 => array()
            ),
            'page2.html' => array(
                0 => 1,
                1 => array()
            )
        )
    ),
    'test.html' => array(
        0 => 1,
        1 => array()
    )
);
share|improve this question
    
You first of all need a data-structure which can be re-used in the different layers of the applications. Provide recursive iteration onto that structure then you can decorate the iteration with sorting. Alternatively you can decorate the data-structure with sorting or add the sorting information to the data-structure already. –  hakre Dec 10 '12 at 18:55
    
@hakre: Do you mean that I should for example create a NavigationItem class, a NavigationParent class, etc? And that I should create objects of those classes from the data? And that I should then sort those objects? But wouldn't that be even more inefficient? What do you mean with "decorate the data-structure with sorting"? And isn't it true that I can't add the sorting information to the data-structure, unless I edit the navigation files? –  Frog Dec 10 '12 at 19:09
    
Take the data-structure on a sheet of paper first, so no code is in your way. Where does the sort-order of the items come from? - Edit: - Also: As $order is an object, why do you pass it as reference? –  hakre Dec 10 '12 at 19:11
    
@hakre: Indeed a stupid mistake to pass the object as a reference. As a matter of fact I've drawn out three versions of the data-structure on paper, and this is the best I've come up with. The order should be something that is editable from a user interface. So by default the items can be ordered randomly, but the user should be able to change the order of menu items. So it doesn't come from somewhere, it should only be possible to change it. –  Frog Dec 10 '12 at 19:33
    
And how is the order specified? on item relative to the other (on the same level)? So each item could have a sort value and when two items are re-ordered, they swap these sort values. If you want to store sort different to the other data of the items, you need to map sort values to item values. It looks like you used the URL for it, you probably want to give each item a hash instead and encapsulate the hash calculation. The reference btw. is not causing concrete problems (at least as far I could see), but remove it. Also add the typehint to the parameter if you use it. –  hakre Dec 10 '12 at 19:39
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