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When I'm using constructor invocation notation (declare-)defining a pointer to pointer (instead of assignment notation - of course that will do the same thing at runtime; it's just a convention), I get a compiler error. I was wondering why this is.

struct  Foo 
{ /* ... */ };

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  Foo*  parFoo = new Foo[2];
  Foo** ppFoo(&parFoo); // invalid: C2059
  Foo** ppFoo = &parFoo; // OK

  delete[] parFoo;
}

The error is a C2059 - invalid token, which doesn't say a lot. However, the & isn't the problem (meaning that it's probably not an operator precedence error). If I do the following:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  Foo*  parFoo = new Foo[2];
  Foo** ppFoo = &parFoo; // OK
  Foo** ppFoo2(ppFoo); // invalid: C2061

  delete[] parFoo;
}

...then I get a C2061, meaning that this time it's the ppFoo identifier that's in the wrong place.

What syntactical rule causes this, i.e. why can't the constructor invocation notation be used to define pointers to pointers, only "less degree pointed to" types?

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4  
Works for me. Maybe this is a VisualC++ thing. –  Robᵩ Dec 10 '12 at 18:50
1  
1st example compiled fine using ideone.com (gcc I suppose). As for second you probably made a mistake, should be Foo** ppFoo2(ppFoo)? <- note ppFoo. Well actually there's mistake in first example too (duplicated names) but that's minor. –  queen3 Dec 10 '12 at 18:50
    
@queen3 +1 for the ideone.com suggestion, it's quite cool and for spotting the typo. fixed it now; the problem persists tho. –  zyndor Dec 10 '12 at 20:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It looks like valid C++. And, as others pointed out, GCC does accept it. As per compiler error you get, it looks like a bug in MSVC's parser.

In fact adding parentheses helps it to parse the code correctly:

Foo*  parFoo = new Foo[2];
Foo (**ppFoo2)(&parFoo); // compiles in MSVC too
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Is this a reported bug? –  iccthedral Dec 10 '12 at 19:26
    
Thank you for the reply and for the workaround solution. –  zyndor Dec 10 '12 at 20:31
    
@iccthedral: I have no idea. –  ybungalobill Dec 10 '12 at 20:31

In VS2005 the code can be reduced to a mere

int main() {
  int** ppFoo(0);
}

and it generates the same error. Obviously it is a bug in the compiler.

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