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I use underscore.js in my current project which has a nice _.groupBy method.

this groups my array's in such a format.

var obj1 ={
  '0':[{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...}],
  '1':[{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...}],
  '2':[{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...}]
}

var obj2 = {
  '0':[{ ... another json object...},{ ...another json object...}],
  '1':[{ ... another json object...},{ ...another json object...}],
  '2':[{ ... another json object...},{ ... another json object...}]
}

now I want to join/merge/extend them... but _.extend does not work as I would expect it.

My expected result would be

{'0':[{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...},{ ... another json object...},{ ...another json object...}],
'1':[{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...},{ ... another json object...},{ ...another json object...}],
 '2':[{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...},{ ... json object...},{ ... another json object...},{ ... another json object...}]}

basically I need to extend the array based on the json key of obj1 and obj2 even if the inner json objects are different.

Would basically need something like a sql join operation for json objects...

So any help would be great...

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1  
Those aren't JSON objects. They're just objects. :-) JSON is a textual data notation (it's a subset of what you're using there, which is JavaScript object initializer syntax). (And those examples are perfectly valid object initializers, but wouldn't be valid JSON, which requires keys and strings be in double quotes, not single quotes.) Sorry not to be able to help with the actual problem, I don't know underscore.js at all, so I don't know if it has something to help you with this. JavaScript itself doesn't, you just have to loop through and do the array appending yourself. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 10 '12 at 19:09
    
Ok. thanks for the heads up. This is what comes out of the underscore groupBy ... does this effect anything on the _.extend method. Or did you mentioned it for the correctness of the wording. Thanks for the reply =) –  silverfighter Dec 10 '12 at 19:12
    
@ silverfighter: Just to correct the terminology, because sometimes it matters. Sorry not to be of any help with underscore.js, I don't know it. (I added a bit to the comment above if you didn't see it.) Best, –  T.J. Crowder Dec 10 '12 at 19:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, as no underscore.js-specific answer has appeared, here's a general JavaScript one:

To merge obj2 into obj1, loop through obj2's entries and append those arrays to the equivalent arrays on obj1, like this:

var key, a1, a2;
for (key in obj2) {
  if (obj2.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
    a2 = obj2[key];
    a1 = obj1[key];
    if (a1) {
      a1.push.apply(a1, a2); // Tricky, see below
    }
    else {
      obj1[key] = a2;
    }
  }
}

That merges obj2 into obj1, modifying obj1's arrays in place. It reuses obj2's arrays if obj1 doesn't have one in the corresponding slot.

Live Example | Source

About that "tricky" bit:

a1.push.apply(a1, a2);

What that does is append the elements from a2 to the end of a1. Details on my blog, but basically, Array#push adds elements to the end of the array, as many as you specify as arguments (e.g., a.push(1, 2, 3) pushes 1, 2, and 3 onto the array), and Function#apply calls the function specifying what to use as this (the first argument) and the arguments to pass to it, as an array (the second argument).

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