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I have 2 classes that manage the operation of 2 different brands of net cam, each have exactly the same public members, but very different private members. One or the other of them is docked inside of a Pane class ( which type is decided at run time). The Pane class provides additional display functionality plus control of whichever camera is docked. When an application instantiates the Pane class, and specifies the type of camera is to be docked, I would like to have the Pane instantiate the proper camera class so that it can call on that class.

My issue is illustrated in the last line of this example code... camera doesn't have a .Start() method because camera is of type Object not of one of the two CameraType types.

How do I get 'object camera' to expose at design time the members of the assigned class so that Pane.Start() winds up calling the Start() method of the class assigned in the switch/case block?

Thank you for your time, Dave

public class CameraType1  //not to be used directly
{
    public CameraType1()
    {
        Stuff specific to this type of camera
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        // Stuff specific to starting a stream to this type
    }
}

public class CameraType2  //not to be used directly
{
    public CameraType2()
    {
        // Stuff specific to this type of camera
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        // Stuff specific to starting a stream to this type
    }
}

public class Pane
{
    object camera;

    public Pane(string CameraTypeToDeploy)
    {
        switch (CameraTypeToDeploy)
        {
            case "Type1":
                camera = new CameraType1();
                break;
            case "Type2":
                camera = new CameraType2();
                break;
        }
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        camera.Start();   //wrong... camera doesn't have a Start() method
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need a common base type. You can define an interface that all camera types implement or you can create an abstract base type from which all cameras inherit. Or you can make both. Program against the interface and supply a base class implementing the interface and providing implementations of members commonly used.

public interface ICamera
{
    string Name { get; }
    void Start();
}

public abstract class CameraBase : ICamera
{
    public abstract void Start(); // Needs to be overridden in non abstract classes.
    public virtual string Name { get; protected set; } // May be overridden.
}

public class CameraType1 : CameraBase
{
    public CameraType1()
    {
        // Stuff specific to this type of camera
        Name = "Type 1";
    }

    public override void Start()
    {
        // Stuff specific to starting a stream to this type
    }
}

public class CameraType2 : CameraBase
{
    public CameraType2()
    {
        // Stuff specific to this type of camera
        Name = "Type 2";
    }

    public override void Start()
    {
        // Stuff specific to starting a stream to this type
    }
}

public class Pane
{
    ICamera camera;

    public Pane(string CameraTypeToDeploy)
    {
        switch (CameraTypeToDeploy) {
            case "Type1":
                camera = new CameraType1();
                break;
            case "Type2":
                camera = new CameraType2();
                break;
        }
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        camera.Start();   //OK, all cameras have a Start() method
    }
}

An interface gives a great flexibility and a high degree of decoupling; however, it does not provide any implementation that can be reused.

A common base class (abstract or not) without interface creates a high degree of coupling between the classes but can provide ready to use implementations of members for all deriving classes.

You can combine the advantages of both, as shown in my example. If a camera should be very different from all the others, you could still decide to let it implement the interface directly without deriving from CameraBase. Of cause you can also have several camera base classes for different groups of resembling cameras (e.g. different camera types from the same company with similar APIs).


UPDATE #1

According to your comment, your camera classes are derived from vendor supplied base types. You can still let them implement an interface.

public class VendorSpecificCamera
{
    public string Name { get; } 
    public bool VendorSpecificStart(int mode, int framesPerSecond)
}

public class CameraType1 : VendorSpecificCamera, ICamera
{
    // The 'Name' property is inherited from the vendor specific base class and
    // is therefore already implemented in this example.

    public bool CameraStarted { get; private set; }

    public void Start()
    {
        CameraStarted = VendorSpecificStart(2, 25);
    }
}

In case the vendor type has already members matching the signature of the interface members, you don't have to do anything in your derived class. If not, just supply the missing members.


UPDATE #2

In case a vendor specific camera class should be sealed, you cannot derive your own class from it. You would then create a wrapper class around the vendor class

public class CameraType1 : ICamera
{
    private VendorSpecificCamera _camera;

    public CameraType1()
    {
        _camera = new VendorSpecificCamera();
    }

    public string Name { get { return _camera.Name; } } 

    public bool CameraStarted { get; private set; }

    public void Start()
    {
        CameraStarted = _camera.VendorSpecificStart(2, 25);
    }
}

You can also make the vendor specific camera visible through a read-only property, allowing you to access vendor specific properties.

public VendorSpecificCamera Camera { get { return _camera; } }
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I get that, but sadly when I went to try and implement that I found that I had made a mistake in my original post. In my post I made it look like that the CameraType1 and CameraType2 were base types. They aren't... they are derived from vendor supplied base types. What I am doing is adding a handful of consistent methods to all of these derived classes for the Pane class to use. Is there a way to apply an Interface to a derived class so that only methods declared in the Interface are available to the Pane class? (that is, same question, but with derived classes instead of base classes) –  davecove Dec 11 '12 at 4:01
    
I updated my answer for the case that you derive your classes from vendor specific classes. Note: A class can derive from exactly one class (if you don't specify one, this will implicitly be System.Object or object). But a class can implement several interfaces. Always specify the base class first and then the interfaces. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 11 '12 at 12:56
    
Super! Exactly what I needed! Thank you all... Dave –  davecove Dec 11 '12 at 13:25

You make both implement an interface ICamera:

  public interface ICamera
  {
      void Start();
  } 

  public class Camera1 : ICamera 
  { 
       // your existing implementation 
  }

  public class Camera2 : ICamera 
  { 
       // your existing implementation 
  }

 public class Pane
 {
     ICamera camera;

     public Pane(string CameraTypeToDeploy)
     {
        // Your existing code
     }
     }

     public void Start()
     {
         camera.Start();   //ok, ICamera has a start method
     }
 }

Interfaces is the simplest way to tell the program that several classes provides the same functionality and can be used interchangably. The other option (abstract classes or simple inheritance) tends to make everything more confusing, but is sometimes an option as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Can I somehow 'mask' several different derived classes with the same Interface if I add the members described in the Interface to each class? –  davecove Dec 11 '12 at 4:28

Create an interface which contains the .Start() method and have both CameraType1 and CameraType2 implement it. And have the property camera on Pane be of that interface.

public Interface CameraType
{
    void Start();
}

public class CameraType1 : ICameraType  //not to be used directly
{
    public CameraType1()
    {
        Stuff specific to this type of camera
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        // Stuff specific to starting a stream to this type
    }
}

public class CameraType2 : ICameraType  //not to be used directly
{
    public CameraType2()
    {
        // Stuff specific to this type of camera
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        // Stuff specific to starting a stream to this type
    }
}

public class Pane
{
    ICameraType camera;

    public Pane(string CameraTypeToDeploy)
    {
        switch (CameraTypeToDeploy)
        {
            case "Type1":
                camera = new CameraType1();
                break;
            case "Type2":
                camera = new CameraType2();
                break;
        }
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        camera.Start(); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Like a duplicated case statement... –  Khan Dec 10 '12 at 20:19
1  
Removed the first half, it probably shouldn't have been offered as a possible solution to begin with ;) –  Khan Dec 10 '12 at 20:24

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