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I have a char array that has number 0-8 in it in char form

Board[0] = '0';
Board[1] = '1';
Board[2] = '2';
Board[3] = '3';
Board[4] = '4';
Board[5] = '5';
Board[6] = '6';
Board[7] = '7';
Board[8] = '8';

and some of them are changed to either an 'x' or an 'o' based on user input however I need to figure out a way so that I can tell the total number of them that aren't an 'x' or an 'o'.

What I mean is if say 4 of the 9 are either an 'x' or an 'o' I need to be able to get the fact that there are 5 left. I was attempting to use for each(char c in Board) and I got far enough to where I got it to list the chars that aren't an 'x' or an 'o' but I can't figure out how to get it to send how many are left to an int value. This is as far as I got.

    for each(char c in Board)
    {
        if (c != 'x' && c != 'o')
        {

        }
    }
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for each(... in ...) is not C++. –  ybungalobill Dec 10 '12 at 20:13
    
considering I wrote in in c++ and it works. yes it is –  Ian Lundberg Dec 10 '12 at 20:15
1  
It is not standard C++ for sure. –  juanchopanza Dec 10 '12 at 20:15
    
I am using vs compiler so that may be why –  Ian Lundberg Dec 10 '12 at 20:16
2  
Even if your compiler accepts that syntax, I wouldn't recommend submitting it. Your instructor expects you to use the syntax you've been taught this semester. Consult your textbook and class notes for the syntax of for loops. If you turn in this non-standard code, and your instructor isn't using the same compiler, then you'll probably get marked down because your instructor will be unable to test it. –  Rob Kennedy Dec 10 '12 at 20:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should define a counter that counts the number of these characters (by incrementing it):

int n = 0;
for (char c : Board)
{
    if (c != 'x' && c != 'o')
    {
        n++; // increment n by 1
    }
}

std::cout << n << '\n'; // use the result
share|improve this answer
    
Another idea is to start with a variable counting the number of free spaces and decrement for every move. –  Thomas Matthews Dec 10 '12 at 20:20

You could try

auto n = std::count_if(Board, Board+9, std::isdigit);
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is_digit accepts '9' while char should be in [0..8]. –  ArtemStorozhuk Dec 10 '12 at 20:22
1  
It is not is_digit, it is isdigit. –  Nawaz Dec 10 '12 at 20:24
    
@Astor there seem to be no '9' ;) corrected the misspelling, thanks. –  Arne Mertz Dec 10 '12 at 22:27

You can use a combination of std::isdigit and std::count_if

#include <cctype>    // for std::isdigit
#include <algorithm> // for std::count_if

int num = std::count_if(Board, Board+9, std::isdigit);
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Assuming you don't just want any digit, and only those between 0 and 8 you could do this:

int count = 0;

for each(char c in Board)
{
    if (c >= '0' && c <= '8')
    {
        count++;
    }
}

cout << count << " are digits between 0 and 8 (inclusive)" << endl;
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