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I'm reading the HTTP spec, and I can't figure out exactly what "entities" are. I read the answer to "What exactly is an HTTP Entity", but I'm still confused.

Specifically, I don't understand the distinction the spec makes between entity-headers and response/request/general-headers. For example, reading the Header Field Definitions section, headers such as Allow, Expires, and Last-Modified are classified as "entity-headers." What does that actually mean? I guess they apply to an "entity-body", but what's the difference between an entity-body and a message-body?

I'd appreciate any clarification on entities and where they fit in a HTTP request/response.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The message is the most generic term and refers to a whole HTTP message, including the start-line, message-header fields, and the message-body (may be empty).

The entity of a message is the payload that is to be transmitted. This can be identical to the message-body, but if there was a transfer encoding applied to the entity, the entity-body is obtained from the message-body by decoding any transfer encodings.

An example for such a transfer encoding is the chunked transfer coding where the entity body is transferred in chunks, e.g.:

HTTP/1.0 OK 200
Transfer-Encoding: chunked

9
This is a
C
 chunked mess
4
age.
0
‍

Here the message-body is:

9
This is a
C
 chunked mess
4
age.
0
‍

but the entity-body is the message-body with decoded chunked encoding:

This is a chunked message.
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I see, that makes more sense! So would the "message-header" contain all four header distinctions (entity, request, response, and generic headers?) And then would the answer to the previous question I posted be incorrect? He says everything except for the response/request line is part of the entity, even though the Host header isn't an "entity-header". –  theabraham Dec 10 '12 at 23:29
1  
@theabraham Again, message-header is the generic term. And any header is a message-header. For requests and responses, there are special request header fields and response header fields. Header fields, that can be used in both requests and responses are general header fields. And header fields that specifically describe the entity are entity header fields. –  Gumbo Dec 10 '12 at 23:41
    
Very cool, thank you. That's what I thought, but the previous answer to a similar question (which I saw you commented on) put everything as an entity. That led to some confusion. –  theabraham Dec 10 '12 at 23:46
    
@theabraham And, yes, as I’ve already commented on the other answer, Host is not an entity header field as it doesn’t describe the entity. It rather describes the destination the entity is to be sent to. –  Gumbo Dec 10 '12 at 23:47

Case 1. You're uploading 3 files in a http request. Those 3 files are 3 entities. Each of them has its own Content-Type to indicate what kind of file it is.

Case 2. You're viewing a web page. Browser has downloaded a html file as the entity via a http response in the background. The file may be updated continuously. So the entity you got yesterday may be different from the one you get today.

Case 3. You've got a 304 Not Modified. No entity has been transmitted.

An entity is an optional payload inside a http request or response. Part of the headers are used to describe it.

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