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Forgiveness, please: I am a beginner. I was looking at another quesiton/answer and came across this code:

SpinningView *spinner = [[SpinningView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0.0, 0.0, 20.0, 20.0)]

// Now let's take a look at the implementation of SpinningView's -initWithFrame: method

- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];

    if (self)
    {
        self.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor];
    }

    return self;
}

I believe that, in the second section of code, self points to the instance to which the message was sent that resulted in "self" being encountered, i.e., the result of [SpinningView alloc]. (Or doesn't that produce an instance?)

So, when you call self = [super initWithFrame:frame] on the 4th line of code, are you not reassigning the pointer value associated with "spinner"? I.e, are you not abandoning the memory you allocated in the first line? Or does the compiler someone know just to copy memory values instead of changing the pointer value? Or... what??

Thanks!

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2 Answers

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@KevinBallard covered most of the points. The reason we need the self = is because init is not guaranteed to return the same object it is called on (it could return a different object or nil). I will answer your questions and expand on the memory management aspects:

I believe that, in the second section of code, self points to the instance to which the message was sent that resulted in "self" being encountered, i.e., the result of [SpinningView alloc].

Yes

So, when you call self = [super initWithFrame:frame] on the 4th line of code, are you not reassigning the pointer value associated with "spinner"?

Yes. Not spinner (spinner doesn't exist at this point anyway). You are re-assigning the pointer variableself inside the method.

I.e, are you not abandoning the memory you allocated in the first line? Or does the compiler someone know just to copy memory values instead of changing the pointer value? Or... what??

Yes. Under MRC, you are just re-assigning the pointer, and the compiler does not do anything except change the pointer value. Under ARC, it's more complicated, but at the end of the day, the compiler just does the same as under MRC in this case, i.e. just re-assigns the pointer.

It's not really "abandoning" the memory if you think about it. You see, by convention, init methods take ownership of ("consume") an already-retained object that they're called on (usually the return result of a call to alloc), and they return a retained object. But these two don't have to be the same object. So when your init method is called, its self is already retained, and the init method owns it, but then it calls [super init...], which calls the superclass's init method on self, so that method now takes ownership of the self which your init had ownership to. And in return, that superclass's init returns back to you a retained instance, which you assign to self. You did not "abandon" self because you gave it to the superclass's init method, which in turn became responsible for memory managing it (including releasing it if it wants to return something else).

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This is the standard idiom for the -init method of obj-c objects. The idea being that, whatever was allocated from +alloc doesn't matter, only what was returned from -init matters. Now, -init will usually just use the already-allocated object that's in self. But it's not required to. It is free to deallocate that object and create a new one. The classic example is when you alloc/init an NSString* you don't actually get back an instance of NSString*, you get back a concrete subclass. This is because NSString* is a "class cluster". So when you call +alloc you get back an NSString*, but when you call -init it frees that object and reallocates an object of one of its subclasses, initializes that new object, and hands it back to you.

Another example would be if you had a class that tried to memoize itself. Lets say you have an immutable class that gets initialized with a number. You could change your -init to re-use existing instances of the class. Here's an example (note: not thread-safe):

static NSDictionary *numberCache;

@interface MyNumber : NSObject
@property (readonly) int number;
- (id)initWithInt:(int)i;
@end

@implementation MyNumber
+ (void)initialize {
    if (self == [MyNumber class]) {
        numberCache = [[NSDictionary alloc] init];
    }
}

- (id)initWithInt:(int)i {
    // find ourself in the numberCache
    NSValue *val = [numberCache objectForKey:@(i)];
    if (val) {
        // yep, we exist. Release the just-allocated object
        [self release];
        // and retain the memoized object and stuff it back in self
        self = [[val nonretainedObjectValue] retain];
    } else if ((self = [super init])) {
        // nope, doesn't exist yet. Initialize ourself
        _number = i;
        // and stuff us into the cache
        val = [NSValue valueWithNonretainedObject:self];
        [numberCache setObject:val forKey:@(i)];
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)dealloc {
    // remove us from the cache
    [numberCache removeObjectForKey:@(_number)];
    [super dealloc];
}
@end
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I'm not seeing init causing the alloc'd instance to be freed :S It looks like it's using something like the flyweight pattern, at least that's what my outputs are showing. –  Paul.s Dec 10 '12 at 21:50
    
@Paul.s: In the code I posted, that's the [self release] before assignment to self. –  Kevin Ballard Dec 10 '12 at 22:19
    
@Paul.s: In the code in your example, if [super initWithFrame:frame] returned something other than the existing value of self, it will have already released the old value. –  Kevin Ballard Dec 10 '12 at 22:19
    
I think you have me confused for the OP. I was talking specifically about the class cluster example of NSString you used. In my tests NSLog(@"%d", [NSString alloc] == [NSString alloc]); //=> 1, which suggests to me that the intermediary NSPlaceholderString is not being freed but is just a flyweight. –  Paul.s Dec 10 '12 at 22:23
1  
@Paul.s: So I did. I don't pay much attention to names. And yeah, [NSString alloc] almost certainly does just return a singleton placeholder. It's a simple enough optimization. –  Kevin Ballard Dec 10 '12 at 22:26
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