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I'm pretty familiar with sed but I don't know awk very well, and I'm not sure how to solve this problem. I've googled for a while but no luck so far. Here's the situation: I've got a big file with groups and sections, like so:

<A1>
  some nr of lines
</A1>
<A2>
  some nr
  of lines
</A2>
<B1>
  some
  nr of
  lines
</B1>
<B2>
  some nr of lines
</B2>
<B3>
  bla
</B3>
<C1>
  bla
</C1>
<C2>
  bla
</C2>

Now the problem is that the number of groups can change, the number of sections can change, and the number of lines in each section can change. For example, section A might go to 25, section B might go to 8, and so on. What I need to do is remove all entries of certain groups, in the example above I'd like to remove everything in <B*>, leaving me with the following:

<A1>
  some nr of lines
</A1>
<A2>
  some nr
  of lines
</A2>
<C1>
  bla
</C1>
<C2>
  bla
</C2>

Additionally, there would be several sections I would want to remove (although these can be in separate runs), for example if the file goes from A1 to R123, I'd want to remove B*, F*, M*, etc.

If something similar has already been asked and answered somewhere I apologize, I did try to find a solution before posting.

Thanks!

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1  
Rather than stick with tools poorly designed for your task, you might look into tools that actually are designed to work with XMLish data: stackoverflow.com/questions/91791/… –  Mark Dec 10 '12 at 21:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Using sed:

sed '/<B1>/,/<\/B3>/d' infile

Which means find a range of text starting from <B1> and ending at </B3> and delete it from sed's output. (that means sed will print rest of file on stdout)

EDIT: This will also work for your case:

sed '/<B[0-9]*>/,/<\/B[0-9]*>/d' 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick reply, unfortunately I thought of that, but I don't know many sections there are in each group. Sometimes it may just be B1 to B3, but other times it may go up into the dozens (or hundreds) –  Martin Dec 10 '12 at 21:05
    
All you need is start text an end text for above sed command. However if to-be-deleted sections are scattered all over the input file at random places then I afraid you will need to repeat above sed command that many times. –  anubhava Dec 10 '12 at 21:07
    
The problem is that I won't manually be looking up the end text. The file is thousands of lines long and modified regularly, and I need to generate a fixed list regularly. The sections should always be contiguous, but they will not be the same length. On average, I'm guessing the file will be ~4000 lines long, and I'm looking to remove a bit under half of it on a regular basis. –  Martin Dec 10 '12 at 21:14
1  
sed '/<B[0-9]*>/,/<\/B[0-9]*>/d' did it! Awesome thank you! –  Martin Dec 10 '12 at 21:20
1  
@anubhava by those statements the OP would want to find B whether it's followed by digits or not but by his examples he wants at least one digit. Either way your RE is incorrect - it should either be <B.*> or <B[0-9][0-9]*>. Also, since it's free-form text between tags the only thing you can perhaps count on from his examples is that if <B> appears in the free form text then it's indented so I think avoiding the trivial tweak of anchoring your REs with ^ and $ to protect from that case would not make sense. –  Ed Morton Dec 10 '12 at 21:38

I think what you're looking for is something like this:

awk -v rmv="AC" 'BEGIN{
   gsub(/./,"|&",rmv)
   sub(/$/,")[0-9]+>$",rmv)
   start = end = rmv
   sub(/^\|/,"^<(",start)
   sub(/^\|/,"^</(",end)
}
$0 ~ start { f=1 }
!f
$0 ~ end   { f=0 }
' file

Just populate the "rmv" variable with the list of all the sections you want removed:

$ awk -v rmv="B" '...'
<A1>
  some nr of lines
</A1>
<A2>
  some nr
  of lines
</A2>
<C1>
  bla
</C1>
<C2>
  bla
</C2>
$ awk -v rmv="AC" '...'
<B1>
  some
  nr of
  lines
</B1>
<B2>
  some nr of lines
</B2>
<B3>
  bla
</B3>
$
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