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The goodness of a string follows these two rules:

  • The goodness of a string containing one or more 'u's is 0
  • otherwise, the goodness of a string is equal to the number of 'g's in the string

"gbbgb" is 2
"gubgb" is 0

#I understand this function
def goodness(s):
    if s.count('u') > 0:
       return 0 
    else:
       return s.count('g') 

#But not this one.
def best_slice(s, k):
    ''' s is str, k is an integer such that 0 <= k <= len(s). Return the starting index of the length-k slice of s with highest goodness. If k is zero, return -1.'''
    stop = len(s) - k  # ?
    best_start = -1 # ?
    best_goodness = 0  
    for i in range(stop + 1):
       cur_slice = s[i:i+k]
       slice_goodness = goodness(cur_slice)
       if slice_goodness > best_goodness:
          best_start = i
          best_goodness = slice_goodness
    return best_start

Can someone please explain this for me, I do not understand it.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by BasicWolf, Platinum Azure, martineau, Allan, talonmies Dec 11 '12 at 5:26

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
what part dont you understand? – Joran Beasley Dec 10 '12 at 21:46
up vote 2 down vote accepted

That code is not particularly pythonic. Consider this instead:

def goodness(s):
    return 0 if 'u' in s else s.count('g')

def substrings(s, length):
    "Generate all substrings of given length."
    for i in range(len(s) - length + 1):
        yield s[i:i+length]

print list(substrings('abcdefgh', 3)) # ['abc', 'bcd', 'cde', 'def', 'efg', 'fgh']   

def best_slice(s, length):
    """Return the 'best' substring."""
    return max(substrings(s, length), key=goodness)

print best_slice('abcgabgoguffg', 3) # 'gog'

Let us know if you have problems understanding this one.

share|improve this answer
2  
You are right that the function is not Pythonic, but you should also answer his question. What if it is someone else's code, or homework? Pointing out a more Pythonic solution is good, but only in addition to giving him the help he actually asked for. – Maxwell Hansen Dec 10 '12 at 22:06

The explanation in the first line of the function sums it up quite nicely, but let's go line through line explaining what's happening.

def best_slice(s, k):
    ''' s is str, k is an integer such that 0 <= k <= len(s). Return the starting index of the length-k slice of s with highest goodness. If k is zero, return -1.'''

Alright, so we've got a function that goes through a string, finding the slice of the string with the highest "goodness". s represents the string, and k is the length of the slice.

    stop = len(s) - k  # ?

This line tells us when to stop looping through slices of s. We do not need to go farther than this because len(s) - k is the last possible starting slice index of length k in the string.

    best_start = -1 # ?

best_start is what we will return if slice_goodness is never greater than best_goodness in our for loop. Thus, the function returns -1 if k is less than 0.

    best_goodness = 0

We set this to 0 so we can loop through all of the slices checking for a goodness higher than 0. Strictly speaking, this variable is not necessary, but it's better to have a named variable than a magic number 0 in our loop. It adds clarity but is not technically needed.

    for i in range(stop + 1):
       cur_slice = s[i:i+k]
       slice_goodness = goodness(cur_slice)

Now we go through the function getting the goodness of slices.

    if slice_goodness > best_goodness:
        best_start = i
        best_goodness = slice_goodness

    return best_start

And if the slice is our best slice yet, we save it to be tested against further slices, and save it's index to be returned in case it is the best slice.

share|improve this answer

Why best_start = -1? Read the specification. It says if k = 0 return -1, so that's what will happen.

Other than that it's trying every possible slice of length k.

For example,

string: "asgeksv" k = 5

then, "asgek", "sgeks" and "geksv" are tried out for best goodness value.

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