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I am new with javascript and have a hard time grasping the concept. I want to add a yes or no form, which submits and adds up when submitted.

Here is the form html:

 <form id="selection" name="selection" method="post">
    <input type="radio" name="choice" value="yes">Yes<br>
    <input type="radio" name="choice" value="no">No<br />
     <input type="reset" name="submit" value="Submit" />
  </form>
    <div id="results">
    Voters who said yes are: <label id="yes">0</label><br />
    Voters who said no are: <label id="no">0</label><br />
    </div>
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3  
You will need to use a server-side technology to store the current count. – Gaby aka G. Petrioli Dec 10 '12 at 21:59
    
what about localStorage ? This only works for HTML5 though, or Cookies. – Mehdi Karamosly Dec 10 '12 at 22:01
2  
If you are hoping to count votes per user (assuming all users aren't using the same browser), you'll have to submit each vote to a server and have the server keep track of the totals. – Tim A Dec 10 '12 at 22:01

If you want to keep track of the total yes/no votes submitted across many different computers, then you will need to keep those totals on the server that you are posting the votes to.

When a vote is posted, you can increment the vote count on the server (probably stored in a database on the server).

If you want the total votes so far displayed in your web page, then you would have to either put that data in the web page on your server when the web page is generated or you would have to fetch the count with an ajax call to your server and then insert the totals into the web page when the ajax call returns the data.

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