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Suppose the following c++ code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

typedef struct 
{
       int a: 5;
       int b: 4;
  int c: 1;
  int d: 22;

} example;

int main()
{
example blah;

blah.a = -5; // 11011
blah.b = -3; // 1101

int result = blah.a << 4 | blah.b;

cout << "Result = " << result << endl; // equals 445 , but I am interested in this having a value of -67 

return 0;
}

I am interested in having the variable result be of type int where the 9th bit is the most significant bit. I would like this to be the case so that result = -67 instead of 445. How is this done? Thanks.

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for int c: 1; the values are -1 and 0. Are you aware of that? –  Mooing Duck Dec 10 '12 at 22:25
    
I think the problem is that shifting signed values is implementation defined, so doing this portably is not quite as easy as one would think. –  Mooing Duck Dec 10 '12 at 22:27
    
Also binary-or'ing negative values won't do anything useful (on most machines).. Can you be clearer about the bitpattern you're expecting as output? –  Mooing Duck Dec 10 '12 at 22:28
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

See Sign Extending an int in C for a closely related question (but not a duplicate).

You need to be aware that almost everything about bit fields is 'implementation defined'. In particular, it is not clear that you can assign negative numbers to a 'plain int' bit-field; you have to know whether your implementation uses 'plain int is signed' or 'plain int is unsigned'. Which is the 9th bit gets tricky too; are you counting from 0 or 1, and which end of the set of bit-fields is at bit 0 and which at bit 31 (counting least significant bit (LSB) as bit 0 and most significant bit (MSB) as bit 31 of a 32-bit quantity). Indeed, the size of your structure need not be 32 bits; the compiler might have different rules for the layout.

With all those caveats out of the way, you have a 9-bit value formed from (blah.a << 4) | blah.b, and you want that sign-extended as if it was a 9-bit 2's complement number being promoted to (32-bit) int.

The function in the cross-referenced answer could do the job:

#include <assert.h>
#include <limits.h>

extern int getFieldSignExtended(int value, int hi, int lo);

enum { INT_BITS = CHAR_BIT * sizeof(int) };
int getFieldSignExtended(int value, int hi, int lo)
{
    assert(lo >= 0);
    assert(hi > lo);
    assert(hi < INT_BITS - 1);
    int bits = (value >> lo) & ((1 << (hi - lo + 1)) - 1);
    if (bits & (1 << (hi - lo)))
        return(bits | (~0 << (hi - lo)));
    else
        return(bits);
}

Invoke it as:

int result = getFieldSignExtended((blah.a << 4) | blah.b), 8, 0);

If you want to hard-wire the numbers, you can write:

int x = (blah.a << 4) | blah.b;

int result = (x & (1 << 8)) ? (x | (~0 << 8)) : x;

Note I'm assuming the 9th bit is bit 8 of a value with bits 0..8 in it. Adjust if you have some other interpretation in mind.


Working code

Compiled with g++ (GCC) 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-44) from a RHEL 5 x86/64 machine.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

typedef struct 
{
    int a: 5;
    int b: 4;
    int c: 1;
    int d: 22;
} example;

int main()
{
    example blah;

    blah.a = -5; // 11011
    blah.b = -3; // 1101

    int result = blah.a << 4 | blah.b;

    cout << "Result = " << result << endl;

    int x = (blah.a << 4) | blah.b;
    cout << "x = " << x << endl;

    int result2 = (x & (1 << 8)) ? (x | (~0 << 8)) : x;
    cout << "Result2 = " << result2 << endl;

    return 0;
}

Sample output:

Result = 445
x = 445
Result2 = -67

ISO/IEC 14882:2011 — C++ Standard

§7.1.6.2 Simple type specifiers

¶3 ... [ Note: It is implementation-defined whether objects of char type and certain bit-fields (9.6) are represented as signed or unsigned quantities. The signed specifier forces char objects and bit-fields to be signed; it is redundant in other contexts. —end note ]

§9.6 Bit-fields [class.bit]

¶1 A member-declarator of the form

 identifier<sub>opt</sub> attribute-specifier-seq<sub>opt</sub>: constant-expression

specifies a bit-field; its length is set off from the bit-field name by a colon. The optional attribute-specifier-seq appertains to the entity being declared. The bit-field attribute is not part of the type of the class member. The constant-expression shall be an integral constant expression with a value greater than or equal to zero. The value of the integral constant expression may be larger than the number of bits in the object representation (3.9) of the bit-field’s type; in such cases the extra bits are used as padding bits and do not participate in the value representation (3.9) of the bit-field. Allocation of bit-fields within a class object is implementation-defined. Alignment of bit-fields is implementation-defined. Bit-fields are packed into some addressable allocation unit. [ Note: Bit-fields straddle allocation units on some machines and not on others. Bit-fields are assigned right-to-left on some machines, left-to-right on others. —end note ]

¶2 A declaration for a bit-field that omits the identifier declares an unnamed bit-field. Unnamed bit-fields are not members and cannot be initialized. [ Note: An unnamed bit-field is useful for padding to conform to externally-imposed layouts. —end note ] As a special case, an unnamed bit-field with a width of zero specifies alignment of the next bit-field at an allocation unit boundary. Only when declaring an unnamed bit-field may the value of the constant-expression be equal to zero.

¶3 A bit-field shall not be a static member. A bit-field shall have integral or enumeration type (3.9.1). It is implementation-defined whether a plain (neither explicitly signed nor unsigned) char, short, int, long, or long long bit-field is signed or unsigned. A bool value can successfully be stored in a bit-field of any nonzero size. The address-of operator & shall not be applied to a bit-field, so there are no pointers to bitfields. A non-const reference shall not be bound to a bit-field (8.5.3). [ Note: If the initializer for a reference of type const T& is an lvalue that refers to a bit-field, the reference is bound to a temporary initialized to hold the value of the bit-field; the reference is not bound to the bit-field directly. See 8.5.3. —end note ]

¶4 If the value true or false is stored into a bit-field of type bool of any size (including a one bit bit-field), the original bool value and the value of the bit-field shall compare equal. If the value of an enumerator is stored into a bit-field of the same enumeration type and the number of bits in the bit-field is large enough to hold all the values of that enumeration type (7.2), the original enumerator value and the value of the bit-field shall compare equal. [ Example:

enum BOOL { FALSE=0, TRUE=1 };
struct A {
    BOOL b:1;
};
A a;
void f() {
    a.b = TRUE;
    if (a.b == TRUE) // yields true
    { /* ... */ }
}

—end example ]


ISO/IEC 9899:2011 — C2011 Standard

The C standard has essentially the same effect, but the information is presented somewhat differently.

6.7.2.1 Structure and union specifiers

¶4 The expression that specifies the width of a bit-field shall be an integer constant expression with a nonnegative value that does not exceed the width of an object of the type that would be specified were the colon and expression omitted.122) If the value is zero, the declaration shall have no declarator.

¶5 A bit-field shall have a type that is a qualified or unqualified version of _Bool, signed int, unsigned int, or some other implementation-defined type. It is implementation-defined whether atomic types are permitted.

¶9 ... In addition, a member may be declared to consist of a specified number of bits (including a sign bit, if any). Such a member is called a bit-field;124) its width is preceded by a colon.

¶10 A bit-field is interpreted as having a signed or unsigned integer type consisting of the specified number of bits.125) If the value 0 or 1 is stored into a nonzero-width bit-field of type _Bool, the value of the bit-field shall compare equal to the value stored; a _Bool bit-field has the semantics of a _Bool.

¶11 An implementation may allocate any addressable storage unit large enough to hold a bitfield. If enough space remains, a bit-field that immediately follows another bit-field in a structure shall be packed into adjacent bits of the same unit. If insufficient space remains, whether a bit-field that does not fit is put into the next unit or overlaps adjacent units is implementation-defined. The order of allocation of bit-fields within a unit (high-order to low-order or low-order to high-order) is implementation-defined. The alignment of the addressable storage unit is unspecified.

¶12 A bit-field declaration with no declarator, but only a colon and a width, indicates an unnamed bit-field.126) As a special case, a bit-field structure member with a width of 0 indicates that no further bit-field is to be packed into the unit in which the previous bitfield, if any, was placed.

122) While the number of bits in a _Bool object is at least CHAR_BIT, the width (number of sign and value bits) of a _Bool may be just 1 bit.

124) The unary & (address-of) operator cannot be applied to a bit-field object; thus, there are no pointers to or arrays of bit-field objects.

125) As specified in 6.7.2 above, if the actual type specifier used is int or a typedef-name defined as int, then it is implementation-defined whether the bit-field is signed or unsigned.

126) An unnamed bit-field structure member is useful for padding to conform to externally imposed layouts.

Annex J of the standard defines Portability Issues, and §J.3 defines Implementation-defined Behaviour. In part, it says:

J.3.9 Structures, unions, enumerations, and bit-fields

¶1 — Whether a ‘‘plain’’ int bit-field is treated as a signed int bit-field or as an unsigned int bit-field (6.7.2, 6.7.2.1).

— Allowable bit-field types other than _Bool, signed int, and unsigned int (6.7.2.1).

— Whether atomic types are permitted for bit-fields (6.7.2.1).

— Whether a bit-field can straddle a storage-unit boundary (6.7.2.1).

— The order of allocation of bit-fields within a unit (6.7.2.1).

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