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g = lambda x:[lambda x:x*1, lambda x:x*x, lambda x:x*x*x, lambda x:42][x%4](x)

[g(x) for x in xrange(12)]

What is the next value of this sequence?

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closed as not a real question by Matt Ball, glglgl, Ashwini Chaudhary, msw, Andy Hayden Dec 10 '12 at 22:41

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
What did you try? –  glglgl Dec 10 '12 at 22:28
1  
The line [x%4](x) errors out. What are you trying to do in that line? –  Maxwell Hansen Dec 10 '12 at 22:31
    
Is this a homework or exam question? –  David K. Hess Dec 10 '12 at 22:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Did you try it?

>>> g = lambda x:[lambda x:x*1, lambda x:x*x, lambda x:x*x*x, lambda x:42][x%4](x)
>>> [g(x) for x in xrange(12)]
[0, 1, 8, 42, 4, 25, 216, 42, 8, 81, 1000, 42]

Here is how each value is calculated:

[
 0,     # x is 0, x%4 is 0, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:x*1)(0) or 0*1
 1,     # x is 1, x%4 is 1, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:x*x)(1) or 1*1
 8,     # x is 2, x%4 is 2, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:x*x*x)(2) or 2*2*2
 42,    # x is 3, x%4 is 3, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:42)(3) or 42
 4,     # x is 4, x%4 is 0, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:x*1)(4) or 4*1
 25,    # x is 5, x%4 is 1, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:x*x)(5) or 5*5
 216,   # x is 6, x%4 is 2, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:x*x*x)(6) or 6*6*6
 42,    # x is 7, x%4 is 3, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:42)(7) or 42
 8,     # x is 8, x%4 is 0, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:x*1)(8) or 8*1
 81,    # x is 9, x%4 is 1, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:x*x)(9) or 9*9
 1000,  # x is 10, x%4 is 2, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:x*x*x)(10) or 10*10*10
 42     # x is 11, x%4 is 3, so g(x) becomes (lambda x:42)(11) or 42
]

Basically g(x) calls one of the functions in the list with x as the argument, when called in a list comprehension with xrange it will cycle through the functions, with every fourth call being the same function.

I know that this is just an exercise to aid in understanding Python, but you should note that this is horribly inefficient code, as all four functions are recreated on each call to g(). If you actually needed this behavior it would be better to just create a function with def that contains several if statements (which would make the code much more readable as well).

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It's a homework exam from the Learn Python meetup group here in Austin Texas. This is a very helpful answer. The instructor described it as a passive aggressive exercise, and I was stumped trying to answer it. –  user1893012 Dec 11 '12 at 17:24

I would do this to get a better idea as to what's happening (leave a comment if you need further explanation)

In [44]: g = lambda x:[lambda x:x*1, lambda x:x*x, lambda x:x*x*x, lambda x:42][x%4](x)

In [45]: {x:g(x) for x in xrange(12)}
Out[45]: 
{0: 0,
 1: 1,
 2: 8,
 3: 42,
 4: 4,
 5: 25,
 6: 216,
 7: 42,
 8: 8,
 9: 81,
 10: 1000,
 11: 42}
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