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I searched for an answer to this question in several places, but I could not find a consistent solution, and some are too old and unclear.

I have a classe where the interface path for dbus is generated in runtime, so I need to export methods with the properly interface, for example:

One instance of my service start dbus with interface br.example.MyInterface.Number1, and a second instance of service start dbus with br.example.MyInterface.Number2, so the decorator for each method will be:

br.example.MyInterface.Number1 ; and br.example.MyInterface.Number2

Cannot make this work with static decorator like @dbus.service.method('com.example.MyInterface.Number1'), because they are distincts.

How can I export methods to dbus in runtime using python?

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1 Answer 1

@dbus.service.method('com.example.MyInterface.Number%d' % (instancenum,))
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Cannot believe that this works, I don't found a single page that cited this before, one of my tries was: @dbus.service.method('com.example.MyInterface.Number' + str(123)), but don't work, I was near :) THANKS! Unfortunally I spend half day searching a solution. But still a problem, I tested and cannot access member classes with self.number for example, just with a global variable. –  Msum Dec 10 '12 at 23:25
    
Only because self isn't in scope there. Declare it in a method, such as __init__(). –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 11 '12 at 0:05
    
If I understood you right, I put the method def test() with the @decorator inside __init__(), the service starts ok, but when I call the method test using dbus-send command I got a error "test is not a valid method of interface". With the method test() in the right place and a hardcoded number in @decorator, works. Sorry, I still new in python programming. –  Msum Dec 11 '12 at 1:09
    
I don't find a way to export the methods dynamically, but I solved my original problem posted here: stackoverflow.com/questions/13765124/… . Because I don't find a way to change the instancenum (of your example) inside a class, I cannot mark this as a answer. –  Msum Dec 28 '12 at 13:09
    
@Msum: That's what closures are for. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 28 '12 at 13:11

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