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the assignment is to find all Mersenne primes with p <= 31 and display in a table:

p     2^p-1
---   ---- 
2      3

3      7

5      31

...

My result so far is this code:

public class PE28MersennePrimeVer2 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        System.out.println("p\t2^p - 1");

        for (int number = 2; number <= 31; number++) {
            if (isPrime(number)) {
                int mersennePrime = (int)(Math.pow(2, number)) - 1;
                if (isPrime(mersennePrime)) {
                    System.out.print(number + "\t" + mersennePrime + "\n");
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public static boolean isPrime(int number) {

        if ((number == 1) || (number == 2)) {
            return true;
        }

        for (int i = 2; i <= number/2; i++) {
            if (number % i == 0) {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }
}

The output is for p up to 19, never reach 31. What I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
you have very strange prime checking algorithm. You should check up to sqrt(number) not up to number/2 –  michael nesterenko Dec 10 '12 at 23:02
    
what's a mersenne prime? –  Sam I am Dec 10 '12 at 23:02
2  
@SamIam: Did you try googling? There's an entire website dedicated to Mersenne Primes (mersenne.org), and wikipedia and MathWorld both have information about them. –  mellamokb Dec 10 '12 at 23:03
    
@mishanesterenko Thank you, I'll fix that –  venta7 Dec 10 '12 at 23:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that

(int)Math.pow(2,31) - 1;

evaluates to 2147483646 instead of 2147483647.

Don't use floating point math when dealing with integers. In Java, using (1 << number) - 1 works (1 << 31 would be undefined behaviour in C due to overflow, but it's defined in Java).

If you cannot use bit-shifts, you can write your own integer-power function. For the small exponents under consideration, the straightforward

long pow(long base, long exponent) {
    long result = 1;
    while(exponent > 0) {
        result *= base;
        --exponent;
    }
}

is good enough (note: I used long instead of int to avoid overflows; although the overflow behaviour is defined in Java, avoiding overflow is cleaner).

With that,

mersennePrime = (int)(pow(2,number) - 1);

does its job (although you should consider using long also for the other variables, not only for the intermediate pow result).

For larger exponents (although that would only be relevant for using BigIntegers - which have their own implementation in the standard library - or modular exponentiation), exponentiation by repeated squaring

long pow(long base, long exponent) {
    long aux = 1;
    while(exponent > 0) {
        if (exponent % 2 == 1) {
            aux *= base;
        }
        base *= base;
        exponent /= 2;
    }
    return aux;
}

would give a big performance advantage.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm still at the beginning of the book (at Chapter 5 Methods) and it is supposed to write the code as much as the material covered by the book so far. I've tried with (long)(Math.pow(2, number) with no success also –  venta7 Dec 10 '12 at 23:12
    
So no bit-shifts? –  Daniel Fischer Dec 10 '12 at 23:13
    
No don't know how to work with them, I'm looking for this bit-shifts on Google now, but it is not supposed to use them, though Thank you for your help –  venta7 Dec 10 '12 at 23:16
    
@venta7 I added a simple (and a less simple) integer power function. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 10 '12 at 23:22
    
Thanks a lot for clarifying this for me. I've just realized that there is still a looooot to learn to have this kind of thinking –  venta7 Dec 10 '12 at 23:31

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