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I have a C++ application that lists all directories, your HDD tree. I can even go into these directories to see what's inside, but I have problems when I want to open the directory of another user on the computer. I have no access to go there and it should state so as it does in Windows XP/Vista/7; instead, I get an error and my app terminates.

How can I handle this, with FILE_ATTRIBUTE_, or something else, so when a user clicks on a directory he can't go into it won`t crash my app? It should just tell him access denied.

My app is made in VS 2010.

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Run your program inside a debugger and when you get the error, look at where it happens and figure out why, instead of just watching the process self-destruct. –  Ben Voigt Jul 14 '13 at 21:16

2 Answers 2

Pre-detect the directories the user cannot enter and do not present them to the user interface.

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Unless you want to get tons of bug reports "it doesn't show my directory" I don't think it's a good idea not to show them. However it's probably a good idea to show them greyed out, and display a message that the user is not allowed to enter the directory when he's trying to open it. –  celtschk Jul 14 '13 at 21:11
    
Per the OP's description of the problem, if they are trying to access folders they have no access to, then they shouldn't be shown the inaccessible folder in the first place. –  JoshDM Jul 14 '13 at 22:06
    
Strange, I read that differently. Of course he doesn't want to show what's inside those directories, but "when a user clicks on a directory he can't go into it won`t crash my app? It should just tell him access denied." does not exactly sound like hiding the directory. –  celtschk Jul 14 '13 at 22:10

All you need to do is check the return value from FindFirstFile (or whatever function you use to look inside a directory) and give the user a warning instead of further processing.

The crash probably comes from trying to use the result buffer after the function failed. When the function fails, you should not look at what's in the result buffer or pass it to any other functions (like FindNextFile), instead assume it is total garbage.

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