Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was reading an article on a 'tag based' resource system implemented by Bungie for the BLAM! game engine. And I came across a mysterious syntax (C structs I think?) and I was wondering what permits this? How can this syntax be valid? And by what method is it achieved?

I have pasted the snippet that is of question below.

TAG_GROUP(
sound_environment,
SOUND_ENVIRONMENT_TAG,
sizeof(sound_environment))
{
     {_field_real, "room intensity"},
     {_field_real, "room intensity hf"},
     {_field_real, "room rolloff (0 to 10)"},
     {_field_real, "decay time (.1 to 20)" },
     {_field_real, "decay hf ratio (.1 to 2)"},
     {_field_real, "reflections intensity:dB[-100,10]"},
     {_field_real, "reflections delay (0 to .3):seconds" },
     {_field_real, "reverb intensity:dB[-100,20]"},
     {_field_real, "reverb delay (0 to .1):seconds"},
     {_field_real, "diffusion"},
     {_field_real, "density"},
     {_field_real, "hf reference(20 to 20,000)},
}; 
share|improve this question
2  
Probably a macro, but that's just a guess. –  Chris Dec 11 '12 at 0:17
    
Heres a good example of why macros suck. –  John Dibling Dec 11 '12 at 0:21
    
@JohnDibling: Why does that suck exactly? There may be a very good reason for making this initialization macro and it looks perfectly clear to me. –  Ed S. Dec 11 '12 at 0:26
    
@eds: This could have been accomolished using Standard C++ mechanisms that are strongly typed, and part of the language so that you can have a full understanding of what this code is doing just by knowing C++. –  John Dibling Dec 11 '12 at 0:33
2  
@JohnDibling: Via what mechanism (other than a macro) could you do something like this (a bit hard to say without seeing the pre-processed output, given)? Sometimes there is not a better practical solution. Macros can be abused, sure, but they are also very powerful. Also, this is tagged as C++, but it looks more like C to me. –  Ed S. Dec 11 '12 at 1:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

TAG_GROUP looks like a macro; if so, then it's expanding to something else, in which case the syntax could be correct depending on what it's expanding to.

For instance, if TAG_GROUP is expanding to a 2D array or even an array of structs, then that initialization is valid, as it's a standard initialzation list.

Take the following program, which compiles:

int main() 
{
    const char* _field_real = "xyz";
    const char* a[12][2] = {
        {_field_real, "room intensity"},
        {_field_real, "room intensity hf"},
        {_field_real, "room rolloff (0 to 10)"},
        {_field_real, "decay time (.1 to 20)" },
        {_field_real, "decay hf ratio (.1 to 2)"},
        {_field_real, "reflections intensity:dB[-100,10]"},
        {_field_real, "reflections delay (0 to .3):seconds" },
        {_field_real, "reverb intensity:dB[-100,20]"},
        {_field_real, "reverb delay (0 to .1):seconds"},
        {_field_real, "diffusion"},
        {_field_real, "density"},
        {_field_real, "hf reference(20 to 20,000)"},
    };     
    return 0;
}

Now, imagine if TAG_NAME used the parameters to build up the appropriate definitions and tacked on an =. Then essentially, it built up the equivalent of the const char* a[12][2] (or whatever types it's using).

A good rule of thumb when you see code like this is to think macro, and think of what substitutions can lead to legal code. Also, a convention I have often seen is that names that look like functions, but are in all caps are macros.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! - off topic, but you seem to know your stuff.. Why use a macro? For this case I mean. –  Steven Floyd Dec 11 '12 at 0:29
    
Thank you. I imagine they're using macros because the declaration of the variable is based on the parameters and they wanted to save some effort. Macros are useful in cases where you need to generate code, like declarations or even functions on the fly, but always at compile time. –  RonaldBarzell Dec 11 '12 at 0:31
    
But surely this would have been possible using a standard function implementation? –  Steven Floyd Dec 11 '12 at 0:33
    
Not necessarily; macros are more powerful than functions. But sometimes people use macros out of a desire for speed, since they are compile time and save the overhead of a function call. Whether this desire is missplaced is another matter. –  RonaldBarzell Dec 11 '12 at 0:35
    
@StevenFloyd How are functions relevant? TAG_GROUP apparently defines a structure. Here's a clue: the "stuff" here that user1161318 knows is common straightforward stuff that every remotely experienced C programmer knows ... but you don't. Get some experience before making claims about what "surely" must be the case. –  Jim Balter Dec 11 '12 at 3:43

this is the key part

TAG_GROUP(
sound_environment,
SOUND_ENVIRONMENT_TAG,
sizeof(sound_environment))

Which indicates there is a macro "TAG_GROUP" doing some magic.

share|improve this answer
    
But what of the bracket initialization inside of the macro? –  Steven Floyd Dec 11 '12 at 0:20
    
@JohnCamero: It's probably declaring and initializing and array of structures or a multidimensional array. Each { ... } creates an instance of a struct or an array. Look at the declaration of sound_environment, I bet it has two fields first; a type identifier and a description string. –  Ed S. Dec 11 '12 at 0:22
    
@EdS. Yes, they use this TAG_BLOCK to create easy interface to their game 'tag' editor. These are just fields for the editor. But I am trying to work out what kind of macro goes into this. –  Steven Floyd Dec 11 '12 at 0:28
    
@JohnCamero: I'm not sure what you mean by "what kind of macro goes into this". Surely you can look at the macro definition. –  Ed S. Dec 11 '12 at 0:29
    
@EdS. No, the actual macro definition is not released. This is just them showing the result of their setup. –  Steven Floyd Dec 11 '12 at 0:30

TAG_GROUP looks like a macro that is used to make initializing a data structure a little convenient. The giveaway is that inside the braces, everything looks like initialization code. Therefore, TAG_GROUP is not a macro for a function signature, but a macro that initializes an array of sorts.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.