Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a centralized StructureMap configuration that various user interface applications append to. I have never had the need to modify the "core" configuration only append to it. I've run into an instance today where I need to modify / remove the core configuration for a particular application. Of course I could move the core configuration code out to the different application, but before I do so I wanted to be sure I was not missing something obvious with the StructureMap api. Below is an abbreviated version of my core configuration:

ObjectFactory.Initialize(cfg =>
{
    cfg.Scan(scan =>
        {
            scan.Assembly("Core");
            scan.WithDefaultConventions();

            scan.ConnectImplementationsToTypesClosing(typeof(IValidationRule<>));
            // more after this....
        }
}

At runtime for this one application I would like to remove the configuration for types closing IValidationRule, but have yet to come up with anything viable. All of the eject methods seem to center around singletons meaning. Since I am not dealing with a singleton the following does not work:

ObjectFactory.Model.For(typeof(IValidationRule<>)).EjectAndRemoveAll(); //no work

ObjectFactory.Model.EjectAndRemove(typeof(IValidationRule<>)); //nor does this

Is there a way that I can modify my StructureMap configuration to not look for IValidationRules? Can I eject non-singleton instances of IValidationRules? Do I have other options for modifying my StructureMap configuration?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What about something like the following? I think this should work.

ObjectFactory.Model.EjectAndRemoveTypes(match
    => match != null && match.GetInterfaces().Any(i
        => i.Name.Contains("IValidationRule")));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.