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Basically, I have this game where once guesses the correct answer it starts a new game with a new word. I want to display Correct! but after three seconds, change it to a empty string. How do I do that?

My attempt:

if (anagram.isCorrect(userInput.getText()))
    {

        anagram = new Anagram();
        answer.setText("CORRECT!");
        word.setText(anagram.getRandomScrambledWord());
        this.repaint();
        try
        {
        Thread.currentThread().sleep(3000);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
        }
        answer.setText("");

    } else
    {
        answer.setForeground(Color.pink);
        answer.setText("INCORRECT!");
    }

Edit:

My solution:

private void jButton1ActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt)
    {
        // TODO add your handling code here:
    if (anagram.isCorrect(userInput.getText()))
    {
        answer.setText("CORRECT!");

        ActionListener taskPerformer = new ActionListener()
    {
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt)
    {
        anagram = new Anagram();
        word.setText(anagram.getRandomScrambledWord());
        answer.setText("");
        userInput.setText("");
    }
    };
    Timer timer = new Timer(3000, taskPerformer);
    timer.setRepeats(false);
    timer.start();
    } else
    {
        answer.setForeground(Color.pink);
        answer.setText("INCORRECT!");
    }
    }

I am not sure, but I hope that I am following MadProgrammer's advice and not blocking the event itself, but the new thread. I will look up Java Timer also.

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3  
Don't sleep on the EDT; do see Concurrency in Swing and consider javax.swing.Timer. –  trashgod Dec 11 '12 at 1:28
    
Thank you. What I did was start a new thread. And told that Thread to wait 3 seconds before starting a new game. –  Raza Farooq Dec 11 '12 at 2:44
    
You are welcome, but you are still seeping of the EDT; javax.swing.Timer has the advantage of executing its action on the EDT. –  trashgod Dec 11 '12 at 2:48
1  
Now, I've implemented the javax.swing.Timer. Thanks again, lol. –  Raza Farooq Dec 11 '12 at 3:09
    
Why, create a new ActionListener and Timer every time, this is executed? isn't it better to keep them global? –  MouseEvent Dec 11 '12 at 3:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Swing is an event driven environment. While you block the Event Dispatching Thread, not new events can be processed.

You should never block the EDT with any time consuming process (such as I/O, loops or Thread#sleep for example).

You might like to have a read through The Event Dispatch Thread for more information.

Instead, you should use a javax.swing.Timer. It will trigger a ActionListener after a given delay.

The benefit of which is that the actionPerformed method is executed with the context of the Event Dispatching Thread.

Check out this or this or this or this for an examples

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if these piece of code is in the event handlers, then you are holding up the UI thread, and it is not going to work as UI update will only happens after you finished your work in the event handlers.

You should create another thread do the work of "sleep 3 second, and change the text field, and trigger repaint". Using Timer or similar utilities is the easiest way to achieve what I am describing.

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