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For reasons I am unable to solve, I am delivered R data with odd timezones.

I wish to test if the latest date in the data-set is equal to a given date (say, current date), however I am having problems with (unwanted) timezone conversion. Is there a natural way to test if two date-strings are the same, even if the timezones are different? I will not necessarily know the time zone of the data.

I have hit upon two 'solutions', however both seem like inefficient (and limiting) hacks:

substr(as.character(last(odd_data$date)), 1, 10) == substr(as.character(Sys.Date()), 1, 10)

and

lastDate <- as.POSIXlt(last(odd_data$date))
as.Date(paste0(lastDate$year + 1900, "-", lastDate$mon + 1, "-", lastDate$mday)) == Sys.Date()

Both get me the answer i need, but i feel that i am working against the language.

The question I wish to answer is: if folks in the different timezones wrote down the date at which the experiement was conducted, would it have been the same date as the one I supply (which the example code is Sys.Date())?

--

disambiguation -- say i have these two dates:

> date.Syd <- as.POSIXct("2012-12-11 08:30:01", tz = 'Australia/Sydney')
> date.Syd
[1] "2012-12-11 08:30:01 EST"

> date.Ldn <- as.POSIXct("2012-12-11 23:00:11", tz = 'GMT')
> date.Ldn
[1] "2012-12-11 23:00:11 GMT"

Where:

> as.Date(date.Syd)
[1] "2012-12-10"
> unclass(date.Syd)
[1] 1355175001
attr(,"tzone")
[1] "Australia/Sydney"

> as.Date(date.Ldn)
[1] "2012-12-11"
> unclass(date.Ldn)
[1] 1355266811
attr(,"tzone")
[1] "GMT"

In this case, testing for equality of the dates fails (undesirably) due to time zone conversion:

> as.Date(date.Syd) == as.Date(date.Ldn)
[1] FALSE

Which is why i've used my ugly character/POSIXlt hacks:

> substr(as.character(date.Syd), 1,10) == substr(as.character(date.Ldn), 1,10)
[1] TRUE

and

> date.Syd_lt <- as.POSIXlt(date.Syd)
> date.Ldn_lt <- as.POSIXlt(date.Ldn)

> paste0(date.Syd_lt$year + 1900, "-", date.Syd_lt$mon + 1, "-", date.Syd_lt$mday) == 
+ paste0(date.Ldn_lt$year + 1900, "-", date.Ldn_lt$mon + 1, "-", date.Ldn_lt$mday)
[1] TRUE
share|improve this question
    
"Same date"? Does that mean the date in the timezone is was measured (i.e. the print representation) or does it mean same date when represented as UCT time? –  BondedDust Dec 11 '12 at 2:21
    
This means that the date strings are the same, even if the universal dates would have been different if we'd converted both timestamps to the same timezone. I'll edit my question to reflect this. –  ricardo Dec 11 '12 at 3:15

2 Answers 2

If you convert to Date, you lose the timezone information.

As ?Sys.Date says

‘Sys.Date’ returns the current day in the current timezone.

So, at a given point in time it may return a different value depending on which timezone you're in.

> Sys.setenv(TZ="Australia/Sydney")
> d <- Sys.Date()
> d
[1] "2012-12-11"

> Sys.setenv(TZ="America/Los_Angeles")
> Sys.Date()
[1] "2012-12-10"
> d
[1] "2012-12-11"

Instead, you can use Sys.time() which contains timezone information because it is POSIXct

> Sys.setenv(TZ="America/Los_Angeles")
> .POSIXct(Sys.time(), tz='America/Los_Angeles')
[1] "2012-12-10 18:01:26.667964 PST"
> .POSIXct(Sys.time(), tz='Australia/Sydney')
[1] "2012-12-11 13:01:26.668636 EST"

> Sys.setenv(TZ="Australia/Sydney")
> .POSIXct(Sys.time(), tz='America/Los_Angeles')
[1] "2012-12-10 18:01:26.669352 PST"
> .POSIXct(Sys.time(), tz='Australia/Sydney')
[1] "2012-12-11 13:01:26.669907 EST"

IMO, POSIXlt should be avoided in general, but if you really want, you can convert to POSIXlt

> Sys.setenv(TZ="America/Los_Angeles")
> as.POSIXlt(Sys.time(), tz='America/Los_Angeles')
[1] "2012-12-10 18:09:27.135976 PST"
> as.POSIXlt(Sys.time(), tz='Australia/Sydney')
[1] "2012-12-11 13:09:27.137197 EST"

> Sys.setenv(TZ="Australia/Sydney")
> as.POSIXlt(Sys.time(), tz='America/Los_Angeles')
[1] "2012-12-10 18:09:27.138371 PST"
> as.POSIXlt(Sys.time(), tz='Australia/Sydney')
[1] "2012-12-11 13:09:27.13928 EST"
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the effort. i feel that the ambigiuity in my question undermined your effort. i've upvoted it as it's a good explanation of date and timezone stuff. –  ricardo Dec 11 '12 at 4:25
1  
Just utilize the tz argument to as.Date. as.Date(date.Syd, tz="Australia/Sydney") == as.Date(date.Ldn, tz="GMT") [1] TRUE –  GSee Dec 11 '12 at 4:31
    
thanks. is there a way if you do not know the time zone? –  ricardo Dec 11 '12 at 5:32

The only way I've found to get the datetime functions to recognize the "tz" argument at input is to use as.POSIXlt prior to using as.POSIXct:

> date.p5 <- as.POSIXct( as.POSIXlt(Sys.time(), tz = 'GMT+5'))
> date.m5 <- as.POSIXct( as.POSIXlt(Sys.time(), tz = 'GMT-5'))
> date.p5
[1] "2012-12-11 01:02:51 GMT"
> date.m5
[1] "2012-12-11 11:03:05 GMT"

> date.m5C <-  as.POSIXct(Sys.time(), tz = 'GMT-5')
> date.m5C
[1] "2012-12-10 22:08:19 PST"
> date.p5C <-  as.POSIXct(Sys.time(), tz = 'GMT+5')
> date.p5C
[1] "2012-12-10 22:08:44 PST"

> date.l0PST <-  as.POSIXlt(Sys.time(), tz = 'PST')
> date.l0PST
[1] "2012-12-11 06:15:31 UTC"  # My clock reads 22:15:31 Pacific (US) Standard Time
> date.c0PST <-  as.POSIXct(Sys.time(), tz = 'PST')
> date.c0PST
[1] "2012-12-10 22:15:42 PST"
share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks mate. your advice is always helpful for my general understanding. I think i'm going to have to stick to the string parsing method for my particular issue today. –  ricardo Dec 11 '12 at 23:50

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