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I'm trying to create this layout. Fluid image layout

I would like the layout to be accessible via IE 8 and up and other standard web browsers. So i don't want to use CSS3, if possible.

So far i got this (it's without header and footer as those are primitive to add):

HTML:

<div class="right">
  <div class="left">
    <div class="container clearfix">
    This is an example text<br />
    This is an example text<br />
    This is an example text<br />
    This is an example text<br />
    This is an example text<br />
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

CSS:

.right {background: url('images/bgr.jpg') no-repeat scroll right top #FFFFFF;}
.left {background: url('images/bgl.jpg') no-repeat scroll left top transparent;}
.container {width: 960px; margin: 0 auto; position: relative; text-align: left; border: 1px solid red;}
.clearfix:after {clear: both; content: " "; display: block; font-size: 0; height: 0; visibility: hidden;}

The problem is, when I open it at resolution lower than (pic1Width + pic2Width + contentWidth) the pictures will cover the content making it disapear. I'm also not able add a fluid space on the left and right of the Picture 1 and 2.

Thanks for any hint!

share|improve this question
    
you want the images to go behind the content upon lower screen size? –  Justin Gingy McDonald Dec 11 '12 at 1:53
    
Well, i would like the images to be just on the left and right side of the content upon lower screen size. –  Joudicek Jouda Dec 11 '12 at 12:32
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am assuming the center content is fixed in the middle with a margin:0, auto;

If that is the case, I would

body
{ 
background-image:url('background.gif');
background-repeat:no-repeat;
background-attachment:fixed;
background-position:center; 
}

And create the background image so that a) the pictures hug either side of the content and b) the edges fade into a color that can be solid enough to match the bg color (in case screen is too wide.)

Hope that helps.

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Ok, so I've found a working solution.

<div class="container">
  <div class="container_center">
    <div class="left"></div>
    This is an example text<br />
    This is an example text<br />
    This is an example text<br />
    This is an example text<br />
    This is an example text<br />
    <div class="right"></div>
  </div>
</div>

CSS:

.container {
   position: absolute;
   overflow: hidden;
   height: auto;
   width: 100%;
   top: 0px;
   z-index: 2500;
}

.container_center {
   position: relative;
   background-color: green;
   height: auto;
   width: 400px;
   margin:0 auto;
}

.left{
   position: absolute;
   background: #fff url('images/bgl.jpg') no-repeat 0 100%;
   height: 100%;
   width:100%;
   top: 0px;
   left: -100%;
}

.right {
   position: absolute;
   background: #fff url('images/bgr.jpg') no-repeat 0 100%;
   height: 100%;
   width:100%;
   top: 0px;
   left: 100%;
}

You can check the fiddle of a similar problem: http://jsfiddle.net/pGYsL/

share|improve this answer
    
you should mark this as the correct solution, to mark your problem as solved. –  Christoph Dec 11 '12 at 12:44
    
I couldn't mark it as solved - i got an error that topic is too fresh. But I found out that my solution has one problem. If I have screen resolution width smaller than .container-center width, part of .container-center will remain hidden because it won't show a horizontal scrollbar. Do you know how to deal with that? –  Joudicek Jouda Dec 13 '12 at 0:06
    
The problem I get with this solution is that the background image does not go all the way down to the footer. It only goes as far down as the browser status bar. For pages with a vertical height longer than the viewport height, you get white space after the end of the bottom of the div, when you scroll down. –  Gregory Lewis Jul 20 '13 at 19:50
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As far as I understand the question, this is what you want, which is way easier to create using a <table> than <div>s.

share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to the 90s? Tables are for tabular data, they are not meant to be abused for layout! –  Christoph Dec 13 '12 at 7:24
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