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I defined a block in a class:

BXButton.h

typedef void(^ButtonClicked)(id sender, NSDictionary *userInfo);
@property (assign, nonatomic) ButtonClicked onButtonClicked;
- (void)setClickBlock:(ButtonClicked)buttonClicked;

BXButton.m

- (void)setClickBlock:(ButtonClicked)buttonClicked {
    onButtonClicked = buttonClicked;
}
- (void)internalButtonClicked {
    DLog(@"internal clicked");
    if (self.onButtonClicked) {
        onButtonClicked(self, self.userInfo);
    }
}

And I tried to call like this in a view controller:

[_testButton setClickBlock:^(BXButton *sender, NSDictionary *userInfo) {
        DLog(@"userInfo %@", userInfo);
        [sender startLoading];
        [[BXAPIClient sharedPublicClient]postPath:@"/" parameters:nil success:^(AFHTTPRequestOperation *operation, id responseObject) {
            [sender endLoading];
            //[safeSelf stop];
        } failure:^(AFHTTPRequestOperation *operation, NSError *error) {
            [sender endLoading];
            [self stop];
        }];
    }];

And I always got BAD_ACCESS whenever I try to access [self method] or any variable which is defined outside of the block. Any ideas? Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The reason why you get EXC_BAD_ACCESS is because blocks are created on the stack by default, so if you reference them with an assign property they will simply cease to exist when the stack gets teared down.

In order to fix this you should copy the block into the heap. One way to do that is to use copy instead of assign when defining your property.

Change your declaration to

@property(copy, nonatomic) ButtonClicked onButtonClicked;

and use its setter/getter instead of accessing directly to the ivar when assigning a block

- (void)setClickBlock:(ButtonClicked)buttonClicked {
    self.onButtonClicked = buttonClicked;
}
- (void)internalButtonClicked {
    DLog(@"internal clicked");
    if (self.onButtonClicked) {
        self.onButtonClicked(self, self.userInfo);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes it is resolved! Thanks :] –  PeiSong Dec 11 '12 at 5:59
    
You're very welcome –  Gabriele Petronella Dec 11 '12 at 6:02
    
"because blocks are created on the stack and they don't retain their variables, so when you're calling the block the variables do not exist anymore in memory" The block doesn't exist either. That's the bigger problem. –  newacct Dec 11 '12 at 7:49
    
Can you clarify what you mean? –  Gabriele Petronella Dec 11 '12 at 16:15
    
When he said "block are created on the stack by default" it means, that when you create a block like bl = ^(){ actualBlockCode; };, it behaves like a local variable e.g. int num = 12; When the current function returns, value of num is "invalidated" (stack space used for something else) and the same apply for the block. Just to complete his answer - you can use Block_copy from <Block.h> to move the block to the heap and Block_release to release it. Thanks for the answer, Gabriele. Saved my day! –  k3a Aug 10 '14 at 22:49

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