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I'm trying to extract data from a large CSV file in the following format, assume 'x' is data in the form of text or an integer. Each grouping has an unique id, but not always has the same number of lines per grouping or color. The data is separated from the color by a comma.

id, x
red, x
green, x
blue, x 
black, x

id, x
yellow, x
green, 
blue, x 
black, x

id, x
red, x
green, x
blue, x
black, x

id, x
red, x
green, x
blue, x

id, x
red, x
green, x
blue, x 
black, x

I would like to re-arrange the data in in a column format. The ID should be the first column and any data separated by a comma. My goal is to get it to read the first word in the line and place it in the appropriate column.

line 0 - ID - red - green - blue - yellow - black
line 1 - x, x, x,  , x,
line 2 -  , x, x, x, x,
line 3 - x, x, x,  , x,
line 4 - x, x, x,  ,  ,
line 5 - x, x, x,  , x,

This is what I was trying...

readfile = open("db-short.txt", "r")
datafilelines = readfile.readlines()

writefile = open("sample.csv", "w")

temp_data_list = ["",]*7
td_index = 0

for line_with_return in datafilelines:
    line = line_with_return.replace('\n','') 
    if not line == '':
        if not (line.startswith("ID") or 
                line.startswith("RED") or
                line.startswith("GREEN") or
                line.startswith("BLUE") or
                line.startswith("YELLOW") or
                line.startswith("BLACK") ):
            temp_data_list[td_index] = line
            td_index += 1

            temp_data_list[6] = line
        if (line.startswith("BLACK") or line.startswith("BLACK")):
            temp_data_list[5] = line
        if (line.startswith("YELLOW") or line.startswith("YELLOW")):
            temp_data_list[4] = line
        if (line.startswith("BLUE") or line.startswith("BLUE")):
            temp_data_list[3] = line
        if (line.startswith("GREEN") or line.startswith("GREEN")):
            temp_data_list[2] = line
        if (line.startswith("RED") or line.startswith("RED")):
            temp_data_list[1] = line
        if (line.startswith("ID") or line.find("ID") > 0):
            temp_data_list[0] = line
    if line == '':
        temp_data_str = ""
        for temp_data in temp_data_list:
            temp_data_str += temp_data + ","
        temp_data_str = temp_data_str[0:-1] + "\n"
        writefile.write(temp_data_str)

        temp_data_list = ["",]*7 
        td_index = 0

if temp_data_list[0]:
    temp_data_str = ""
    for temp_data in temp_data_list:
        temp_data_str += temp_data + ","
    temp_data_str = temp_data_str[0:-1] + "\n"
    writefile.write(temp_data_str)
readfile.close()
writefile.close()
share|improve this question
1  
What have you tried so far? The standard library csv module is probably a good place to start. –  James Henstridge Dec 11 '12 at 3:00
    
I know you said you wanted a python solution but have you considered R? It was built for these sorts of tasks –  Stedy Dec 11 '12 at 6:03
    
I will confesss I'm new to programming and I tried using this... ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=6159649&postcount=4 But I kept getting this error. IndexError: list assignment index out of range Now I learned it's because of how the data is formatted I will take a look at R –  the dave Dec 11 '12 at 23:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This assumes Python < 2.7 (and therefore doesn't take advantage of opening multiple files with one with, writing the headers with the built-in writeheaders, etc. Note that in order to get it to work properly, I removed the spaces from between the commas in your CSV. As mentioned by @JamesHenstridge, it would definitely be worth reading up on the csv module so that this makes a bit more sense.

import csv

with open('testfile', 'rb') as f:
  with open('outcsv.csv', 'wb') as o:
    # Specify your field names
    fieldnames = ('id', 'red', 'green', 'blue', 'yellow', 'black')

    # Here we create a DictWriter, since your data is suited for one
    writer = csv.DictWriter(o, fieldnames=fieldnames)

    # Write the header row
    writer.writerow(dict((h, h) for h in fieldnames))

    # General idea here is to build a row until we hit a blank line,
    # at which point we write our current row and continue
    new_row = {}
    for line in f.readlines():
      # This will split the line on a comma/space combo and then
      # Strip off any commas/spaces that end a word
      row = [x.strip(', ') for x in line.strip().split(', ')]
      if not row[0]:
        writer.writerow(new_row)
        new_row = {}
      else:
        # Here we write a blank string if there is no corresponding value;
        # otherwise, write the value
        new_row[row[0]] = '' if len(row) == 1 else row[1].strip()

    # Check new_row - if not blank, it hasn't been written (so write)
    if new_row:
      writer.writerow(new_row)

Using your data above (with some random comma-separated numbers thrown in), this writes:

id,red,green,blue,yellow,black
x,"2,8","2,4",x,,x
x,,,"4,3",x,x
x,x,x,x,,x
x,x,x,x,,
x,x,x,x,,x
share|improve this answer
    
Are you missing the start of an if statement inside the for statement? –  James Henstridge Dec 11 '12 at 3:49
    
@JamesHenstridge Ha yeah, no clue how that didn't get pasted over. Will update in a bit, thanks for pointing that out. –  RocketDonkey Dec 11 '12 at 3:57
    
There are random spaces between the text and the comma, is there a way to make it detect the spaces and delete them? –  the dave Dec 11 '12 at 23:16
    
@thedave Yeah, my bad for altering the data as you presented it. I will add an update in a little bit that addresses that issue. The fix will be striping the whitespace from the string, so you can try row[1].strip() in that line in the meantime (I'll follow up with an update in a bit). –  RocketDonkey Dec 11 '12 at 23:19
    
I just dawned on me that there is another problem, there are commas in to the right of the separator. as in red, 2,7 –  the dave Dec 12 '12 at 2:01

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