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Would it be possible to install a custom handler for GCC?

I'm trying to throw a wrapper class to a pointer (like shared_ptr) and then catch it covariantly. This is actually for my Managed C++ for GCC project (on sourceforge) but to illustrate the problem in a manner more conventional C++ friendly, I'll use boost::shared_ptr in this particular instance. This is what I'm trying to achieve.

void raise()
{
    throw shared_ptr<DerivedException>(new DerivedException);
}

int main()
{
    try
    { 
        raise();
    }
    catch (shared_ptr<Exception> ex)
    {
        // Needs to catch DerivedException too!
    }
}

Any ideas as to whether this is achievable?

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I am not sure what you are trying to achieve. You mean derived from shared_ptr or derived from Exception? Do you really need to throw a shared pointer? –  Loki Astari Dec 11 '12 at 3:54
    
@LokiAstari: Derived from Exception. As the goal of the project is to be as similar to C++/CLI as possible, I'd like to be able to do that. –  Zach Saw Dec 11 '12 at 3:55
1  
As far as I know, you have to convert Boost's shared_ptr using boost::dynamic_pointer_cast, which you can't do when catching. Also, I can't think of a way to work around this. –  Cornstalks Dec 11 '12 at 4:01
    
@Cornstalks: Some compilers (rather its runtime) allow you to install custom exception handlers that would make my example work, I just have no idea how to do that with GCC. –  Zach Saw Dec 11 '12 at 4:08
    
Easiest thing seems to be to "upcast" before throwing –  TBohne Dec 17 '12 at 22:21

1 Answer 1

If I understand correctly, you can do what you want in C++ without a custom exception handler but not with the syntax you are using. One solution I can see is that you combine virtual functions with the exception mechanism. First you create a base class to make catching easy and give it an interface to allow easy rethrowing of the object itself and its referred to object.

struct shared_exception_base_t {
    virtual void raise_ref() = 0;
    virtual void raise_self() = 0;
};

template <class value_t>
class shared_ptr_t : public shared_exception_base_t {
    value_t* ptr_;
public:
    shared_ptr_t(value_t* const p) : ptr_ (p) { }

    void raise_ref()
    {
        throw *ptr_;
    }

    void raise_self()
    {
        throw *this;
    }
};


template <class value_t>
shared_ptr_t<value_t> mk_with_new()
{
    return shared_ptr_t<value_t>(new value_t());
}

Then you can use the exception mechanism to do the discrimination. Note that the try/catch blocks have to be nested.

#include <iostream>

struct file_exception_t { };
struct network_exception_t { };
struct nfs_exception_t : file_exception_t, network_exception_t { };
struct runtime_exception_t { };

void f()
{
    throw mk_with_new<runtime_exception_t>();
}

int
main()
{
    try {
        try {
            f();
        } catch (shared_exception_base_t& x) {
            try {
                x.raise_ref();
            } catch (network_exception_t& fx) {
                std::cerr << "handling network exception\n"; 
            } catch (file_exception_t& fx) {
                std::cerr << "handling file exception\n"; 
            } catch (...) {
                x.raise_self();
            }
        }
    } catch (...) { 
        std::cerr << "no idea\n";
    }

    return 0;
}
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1  
seems a little heavy, replacing all the existing exception functionality –  TBohne Dec 17 '12 at 22:21

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