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I'm really puzzled as to how to call the function. UPDATED code in response to one or more answers. Current code and build errors are listed below.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

//function prototypes
void signs(int x[], int size, int *negPtr, int *zeroPtr, int *posPtr);
double average(int x[], int size, int *greaterPtr);

int main()
{
//variable declarations
int zeroCounter, posCounter, negCounter, greaterThanAveCounter;
double ave;
int i;
int arr[63];
int size = 63;
int x[63], int size, int* negPtr, int* zeroPtr, int* posPtr, int* greaterPtr;

//seeding the random number generator function with the time
srand(time(NULL));

//filling the array with random numbers from the interval [-15, 40]
for(i=0; i<63; i++)
{
    arr[i] = rand()%(40-(-15)+1)+(-15);
}

//printing the array to the screen 9 elements per line
for(i=0; i<63; i++)
{
    if(i%9==0)
    {
        printf("\n");
    }
    printf("%5d",arr[i]);
}

//call function signs
signs (x, size, negPtr, zeroPtr, posPtr);

printf("\n\nThe number of elements that are negative is: %d\n",negCounter);
printf("The number of elements that are equal to zero is: %d\n",zeroCounter);
printf("The number of elements that are positive is: %d\n",posCounter);


//call function average
average(x, size, greaterPtr);

printf("The average of all the elements is: %.2f\n",ave);
printf("The number of elements that are greater than the average is: %d\n",greaterThanAveCounter);

return 0;
}



/***************************************************************************
signs:
This function finds the number of elements that are negative, positive and
equal to zero in an integer array. The number of elements that are negative,
positive and equal to zero are returned by 3 pointers that the function
receives.

Inputs
1. The integer array
2. The size of the aray
3. An integer pointer to the negative counter
4. An integer pointer to the zero counter
5. An integer pointer to the positive counter
***************************************************************************/
void signs(int x[], int size, int *negPtr, int *zeroPtr, int *posPtr)
{
int i;
for (i=0; i<size; i++)
{
    if(x[i]<0)
    {
        (*negPtr)++;
    }
    else if (x[i]==0)
    {
        (*zeroPtr)++;
    }
    else
    {
        (*posPtr)++;
    }
}
}



/***************************************************************************
average:
This function finds the average and the number of elements that are greater
than the average in an integer array. The function returns the value of the
average and returns the number of elements that are greater than the average
using a pointer that the function should receive.

Inputs
1. The integer array
2. The size of the aray
3. An integer pointer to the greater than average counter
***************************************************************************/
double average(int x[], int size, int *greaterPtr)
{
int i;
double ave;
int sum=0;

for (i=0; i<size; i++)
{
    sum+=x[i];
}

ave = (double)sum/size;

*greaterPtr = 0;
for (i=0; i<size; i++)
{
    if(x[i]>ave)
    {
        (*greaterPtr)++;
    }
}
return ave;
}

New Errors

  • (32): error C2059: syntax error : 'type'
  • (35): warning C4244: 'function' : conversion from 'time_t' to 'unsigned int', possible loss of data
  • (54): error C2065: 'negPtr' : undeclared identifier

  • (54): warning C4047: 'function' : 'int *' differs in levels of
    indirection from 'int'

  • (54): warning C4024: 'signs' : different types for formal and actual parameter 3
  • (54): error C2065: 'zeroPtr' : undeclared identifier
  • (54): warning C4047: 'function' : 'int *' differs in levels of indirection from 'int'

  • (54): warning C4024: 'signs' : different types for formal and actual parameter 4

  • (54): error C2065: 'posPtr' : undeclared identifier
  • (54): warning C4047: 'function' : 'int *' differs in levels of indirection from 'int'

  • (54): warning C4024: 'signs' : different types for formal and actual parameter 5

  • (62): error C2065: 'greaterPtr' : undeclared identifier

  • (62): warning C4047: 'function' : 'int *' differs in levels of
    indirection from 'int'

  • (62): warning C4024: 'average' : different types for formal and actual parameter 3
  • 1> 1>Build FAILED.
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
double average(int x[], int size, int *greaterPtr);

is how you declare a function. To call it, you need something like:

int a[10], b, *c;             // should also set these to sensible values.
double d = average (a, b, c);

In terms of your newly added error messages, I'll help out with a few:

int x[63], int size, int* negPtr, int* zeroPtr, int* posPtr, int* greaterPtr;

This is not how you define multiple variables, it should be:

int x[63], size, *negPtr, *zeroPtr, *posPtr, *greaterPtr;

That's probably the single cause of most of your current problems (I haven't confirmed this, it's more from a quick analysis).

share|improve this answer
    
Much more succinct than what I had in mind for an answer - good stuff. –  sje397 Dec 11 '12 at 4:27
    
okay, but I'n not going to be setting my function equal to anything because it's void, therefore returns nothing. –  CorySTG Dec 11 '12 at 4:28
    
Am i making progress with the updated code? There are many many errors this run though. I really want to understand this. This isn't even for credit in the class. We have a final tomorrow and this type of problem was hinted at. –  CorySTG Dec 11 '12 at 4:48
    
@Cory, signs may not return anything but average definitely does. In terms of the new errors, you have to look at the code on the line specified are read the error message. I'll help with a couple of obvious issues but your best bet is to simply go over each error, read it well, and look at the line it's on. See the updated answer for some useful info. –  paxdiablo Dec 11 '12 at 5:11
    
@Cory, in addition, if you're going to be making wholesale changes to the code, it should really be as a separate question. SO is not really designed as a conversational board, more for specific Q&As. If you make massive changes to questions, it tends to invalidate answers made to date, making the whole process of dubious quality. –  paxdiablo Dec 11 '12 at 5:17

signs (x, size, negPtr, zeroPtr, posPtr); is the correct way to call the function. The reason you get undefined errors is because you never declare those variables in the main function, so you need something like

int x[];
int size;
int* negPtr;

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Please look at the updated code. I'm getting many more errors this way. I'm sure its probably something stupid easy i'm not understanding. –  CorySTG Dec 11 '12 at 4:43
    
First off, you can only declare variables of the same type on the same line, such as int x[], size; and int *negPtr, *zeroPtr etc. Also, you have the variables declared, so they now exist. But now you need to initialize them to some value. –  Ken Dec 11 '12 at 4:48
    
okay, I set it up like this: int x[63], size; int* negPtr=0, zeroPtr=0, posPtr=0, greaterPtr=0; now it's really odd, it's telling me that "cannot open source file "stdio.h" and same for the others... –  CorySTG Dec 11 '12 at 4:56
    
Forget err from previous comment. i made a new project and everything is fine with the #include's. Now the errors are: (55): warning C4047: 'function' : 'int *' differs in levels of indirection from 'int' (55): warning C4024: 'signs' : different types for formal and actual parameter 4 –  CorySTG Dec 11 '12 at 5:02
  • (32): error C2059: syntax error : 'type'

You are declaring you variables wrong. This line should read:

int x[63], size, *negPtr, *zeroPtr, *posPtr, *greaterPtr;

I'd recommend keeping one variable declaration to a line, however, since this tends to avoid these kind of errors and makes code a slight bit more readable.

  • (35): warning C4244: 'function' : conversion from 'time_t' to 'unsigned int', possible loss of data

time() returns a time_t and srand() takes an unsigned int. You need to explicitly cast the return value of time() to tell the compiler that you are expecting this to happen:

srand((unsigned int)time(NULL));

The rest of the warnings seem to be knock-on effects from the first error.

share|improve this answer

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