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I'm working on Cassandra Hadoop integration (MapReduce). We have used RandomPartitioner to insert data to gain faster write speed. Now we have to read that data from Cassandra in MapReduce and perform some calculations on it.

From the lots of data we have in cassandra we want to fetch data only for particular row keys but we are unable to do it due to RandomPartitioner - there is an assertion in the code.

Can anyone please guide me how should I filter data based on row key on the Cassandra level itself (I know data is distributed across regions using hash of the row key)?

Would using secondary indexes (still trying to understand how they works) solve my problem or is there some other way around it?

I want to use cassandra MR to calculate some KPI's on the data which is stored in cassandra continuously. So here fetching whole data from cassandra every time seems an overhead to me? The rowkey I'm using is like "(timestamp/60000)_otherid"; this CF contains reference of rowkeys of actual data stored in other CF. so to calculate KPI I will work for a particular minute and fetch data from other CF, and process it.

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Are you writing your own InputFormat or using Cassandra's? –  tysonjh Dec 11 '12 at 19:45
    
@tysonjh I'm using the default InputFormat provided by Cassandra MR - ColumnFamilyInputFormat.java. –  Ayush Vatsyayan Dec 12 '12 at 7:03
    
@All Let me share more details. I want to use cassandra MR to calculate some KPI's on the data which is stored in cassandra continuously. So here fetching whole data from cassandra every time seems an overhead to me? The rowkey I'm using is like "(timestamp/60000)_otherid"; this CF contains reference of rowkeys of actual data stored in other CF. so to calculate KPI I will work for a particular minute and fetch data from other CF, and process it. –  Ayush Vatsyayan Dec 13 '12 at 9:05
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@AyushV I don't see a problem here... You are already using a secondary index in your timestamp/60000_otherid column family to get data from the other CF. You will not be fetching all the data, just what is in the time-range you are interested in based on your index CF. Supposing you can generate this otherid at will, you can emulate a range slice already to create your MapR splits. –  tysonjh Dec 13 '12 at 15:41
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You want to fetch by column range. If your keys are just buckets, then the column names are what you care about. –  rs_atl Dec 18 '12 at 14:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When using RandomPartitioner, keys are not sorted, so you cannot do a range query on your keys to limit the data. Secondary indexes work on columns not keys, so they won't help you either. You have two options for filtering the data:

Choose a data model that allows you to specify a thrift SlicePredicate, which will give you a range of columns regardless of key, like this:

SlicePredicate predicate = new SlicePredicate().setSlice_range(new SliceRange(ByteBufferUtil.bytes(start), ByteBufferUtil.bytes(end), false, Integer.MAX_VALUE));
ConfigHelper.setInputSlicePredicate(conf, predicate);

Or use your map stage to do this by simply ignoring input keys that are outside your desired range.

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Thanks for the reply. Acc to Cassandra API Wiki (wiki.apache.org/cassandra/API), SliceRange could be thought of as Cassandra's version of LIMIT and ORDER BY. At the same time I cannot filter my data in Map, as it is BigData, which will increase continuosly over time. Hence, I don't think it will be a good approach. It seems the only soln cassandra has is to switch from RandomPartioner to OrderPreserving one. I'm now trying to integrate Hector and Hadoop code.google.com/p/hector-hadoop-integration/source/detail?r=3 –  Ayush Vatsyayan Dec 12 '12 at 7:00
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You don't want to use ByteOrderedPartitioner (new name for OPP), as it creates hotspots. And I would argue that map is exactly what you want, precisely because you are dealing with so much data. Hadoop is designed to read ALL your data on EVERY job, and in fact this is quite common. It's the reason you run it in parallel with data locality. Also, slice predicates are very useful with Hadoop if you have a data model that allows for range queries on columns. Since such models are among the most common in Cassandra, this is a useful technique. –  rs_atl Dec 12 '12 at 14:33
    
@rs_etl Though my search requirement meets the BOP, I have to use RandomPartioner due to high write performance (14000 TPS). Let me share more details. I want to use cassandra MR to calculate some KPI's on the data which is stored in cassandra continuously. So here fetching whole data from cassandra every time seems an overhead to me? The rowkey I'm using is like "(timestamp/60000)_otherid"; this CF contains reference of rowkeys of actual data stored in other CF. so to calculate KPI I will work for a particular minute and fetch data from other CF, and process it. –  Ayush Vatsyayan Dec 13 '12 at 9:04
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@AyushVatsyayan Why not use time buckets as your row keys, then you can use a composite column name so you can do range queries using a slice predicate. Otherwise just do it in the map, as 14k TPS isn't really that much and Hadoop can certainly handle it. –  rs_atl Dec 13 '12 at 14:00
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Then use time bucket keys as previously suggested. This will eliminate the duplicate work by allowing you to specify known key ranges in your slice predicate. –  rs_atl Dec 18 '12 at 14:08

Essentially if you want to still use a RandomPartitioner and want the ability to do range slices you will need to create a reverse index (a.k.a. inverted index). I have answered a similar question here that involved timestamps.

Having the ability to generate your rowkeys programmatically allows you to emulate a range slice on rowkeys. To do this you must write your own InputFormat class and generate your splits manually.

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Seems this is one of the most oft-repeated bits of Cassandra advice! –  rs_atl Dec 12 '12 at 19:15
    
@rs_atl agreed =) –  tysonjh Dec 12 '12 at 20:59

I am unfamiliar with the Cassandra Hadoop integration but trying to understand how to use the hash system to query the data yourself is likely the wrong way to go.

I would look at the Cassandra client you are using (Hector, Astynax, etc.) and ask how to query by row keys from that.

Querying by the row key is a very common operation in Cassandra.

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The question is about how to do this with Hadoop, which doesn't make use of a high-level client at all. Only thrift query predicates are supported. –  rs_atl Dec 11 '12 at 20:56
    
@Sarge, Thanks for the reply. Yes, you are right, search by rowkey is very common, but it doesn't work with RandomPartitioner where data is scattered in the region based on the Hash of the key (to avoid Hot Spots). Cassandra's MR only support thrift. I'm trying work on the way for Hadoop and Hector integration code.google.com/p/hector-hadoop-integration/source/detail?r=3 –  Ayush Vatsyayan Dec 12 '12 at 6:54
    
Search by row key does work with RandomPartitioner - this is assuming you're looking for a single row key. Otherwise rs_atl's answer is good. –  Sarge Dec 12 '12 at 18:43
    
@Sarge yes I'm looking for single row key. Could you please help me how does rowkey search works with random partitioner. –  Ayush Vatsyayan Dec 13 '12 at 8:52
    
He's talking about normal get-by-key queries with a high-level client, not Hadoop. –  rs_atl Dec 13 '12 at 13:55

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