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What essential things (functions, aliases, start up scripts) do you have in your profile?

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1  
im favoriting this thread, nice. –  djangofan Aug 1 '09 at 19:20
    
New favorite thread! –  Christopher Ranney Mar 29 '13 at 19:33
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23 Answers

############################################################################## 
# Get an XPath Navigator object based on the input string containing xml
function get-xpn ($text) { 
    $rdr = [System.IO.StringReader] $text
    $trdr = [system.io.textreader]$rdr
    $xpdoc = [System.XML.XPath.XPathDocument] $trdr
    $xpdoc.CreateNavigator()
}

Useful for working with xml, such as output from svn commands with --xml.

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apropos.

Although I think this has been superseded by a recent or upcoming release.

############################################################################## 
## Search the PowerShell help documentation for a given keyword or regular 
## expression.
## 
## Example:
##    Get-HelpMatch hashtable
##    Get-HelpMatch "(datetime|ticks)"
############################################################################## 
function apropos {

    param($searchWord = $(throw "Please specify content to search for"))

    $helpNames = $(get-help *)

    foreach($helpTopic in $helpNames)
    {
       $content = get-help -Full $helpTopic.Name | out-string
       if($content -match $searchWord)
       { 
          $helpTopic | select Name,Synopsis
       }
    }
}
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Yes, Get-Help will now search topic content. –  Keith Hill Dec 16 '09 at 15:10
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$MaximumHistoryCount=1024 
function hist {get-history -count 256 | %{$_.commandline}}

New-Alias which get-command

function guidConverter([byte[]] $gross){ $GUID = "{" + $gross[3].ToString("X2") + `
$gross[2].ToString("X2") + $gross[1].ToString("X2") + $gross[0].ToString("X2") + "-" + `
$gross[5].ToString("X2") + $gross[4].ToString("X2") + "-" + $gross[7].ToString("X2") + `
$gross[6].ToString("X2") + "-" + $gross[8].ToString("X2") + $gross[9].ToString("X2") + "-" +` 
$gross[10].ToString("X2") + $gross[11].ToString("X2") + $gross[12].ToString("X2") + `
$gross[13].ToString("X2") + $gross[14].ToString("X2") + $gross[15].ToString("X2") + "}" $GUID }
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To setup my Visual Studio build environment from PowerShell I took the VsVars32 from here. and use it all the time.

###############################################################################
# Exposes the environment vars in a batch and sets them in this PS session
###############################################################################
function Get-Batchfile($file) 
{
    $theCmd = "`"$file`" & set" 
    cmd /c $theCmd | Foreach-Object {
        $thePath, $theValue = $_.split('=')
        Set-Item -path env:$thePath -value $theValue
    }
}


###############################################################################
# Sets the VS variables for this PS session to use
###############################################################################
function VsVars32($version = "9.0")
{
    $theKey = "HKLM:SOFTWARE\Microsoft\VisualStudio\" + $version
    $theVsKey = get-ItemProperty $theKey
    $theVsInstallPath = [System.IO.Path]::GetDirectoryName($theVsKey.InstallDir)
    $theVsToolsDir = [System.IO.Path]::GetDirectoryName($theVsInstallPath)
    $theVsToolsDir = [System.IO.Path]::Combine($theVsToolsDir, "Tools")
    $theBatchFile = [System.IO.Path]::Combine($theVsToolsDir, "vsvars32.bat")
    Get-Batchfile $theBatchFile
    [System.Console]::Title = "Visual Studio " + $version + " Windows Powershell"
}
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1  
I use leeholmes.com/blog/… to invoke vcvars. –  Jay Bazuzi Dec 26 '08 at 19:38
    
The script above does not work on 64-bit Windows (due to the WOW64 registry redirection). –  Govert Jan 15 '12 at 14:36
    
In that case, just run it in the 32-bit WOW64 cmd.exe shell. Was that not possible? –  djangofan Sep 10 '12 at 18:09
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I keep a little bit of everything. Mostly, my profile sets up all the environment (including calling scripts to set up my .NET/VS and Java development environment).

I also redefine the prompt() function with my own style (see it in action), set up several aliases to other scripts and commands. and change what $HOME points to.

Here's my complete profile script.

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# ----------------------------------------------------------
# msdn search for win32 APIs.
# ----------------------------------------------------------

function Search-MSDNWin32
{

    $url = 'http://search.msdn.microsoft.com/?query=';

    $url += $args[0];

    for ($i = 1; $i -lt $args.count; $i++) {
        $url += '+';
        $url += $args[$i];
    }

    $url += '&locale=en-us&refinement=86&ac=3';

    Open-IE($url);
}

# ----------------------------------------------------------
# Open Internet Explorer given the url.
# ----------------------------------------------------------

function Open-IE ($url)
{    
    $ie = new-object -comobject internetexplorer.application;

    $ie.Navigate($url);

    $ie.Visible = $true;
}
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1  
Instead of Open-IE I use the built-in ii alias for Invoke-Item. –  Jay Bazuzi Jun 25 '10 at 2:56
1  
ii "google.com"; doesn't work. How are you using it Jay? –  Kevin Berridge Jan 24 '11 at 16:45
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This iterates through a scripts PSDrive and dot-sources everything that begins with "lib-".

### ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
### Load function / filter definition library
### ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Get-ChildItem scripts:\lib-*.ps1 | % { 
      . $_
      write-host "Loading library file:`t$($_.name)"
    }
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This creates a scripts: drive and adds it to your path. Note, you must create the folder yourself. Next time you need to get back to it, just type "scripts:" and hit enter, just like any drive letter in Windows.

$env:path += ";$profiledir\scripts"
New-PSDrive -Name Scripts -PSProvider FileSystem -Root $profiledir\scripts
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This will add snapins you have installed into your powershell session. The reason you may want to do something like this is that it's easy to maintain, and works well if you sync your profile across multiple systems. If a snapin isn't installed, you won't see an error message.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Add third-party snapins

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

$snapins = @(
    "Quest.ActiveRoles.ADManagement",
    "PowerGadgets",
    "VMware.VimAutomation.Core",
    "NetCmdlets"
)
$snapins | ForEach-Object { 
  if ( Get-PSSnapin -Registered $_ -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue ) {
    Add-PSSnapin $_
  }
}
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Here's my not so subtle profile


    #==============================================================================
# Jared Parsons PowerShell Profile (jaredp@rantpack.org) 
#==============================================================================

#==============================================================================
# Common Variables Start
#==============================================================================
$global:Jsh = new-object psobject 
$Jsh | add-member NoteProperty "ScriptPath" $(split-path -parent $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Definition) 
$Jsh | add-member NoteProperty "ConfigPath" $(split-path -parent $Jsh.ScriptPath)
$Jsh | add-member NoteProperty "UtilsRawPath" $(join-path $Jsh.ConfigPath "Utils")
$Jsh | add-member NoteProperty "UtilsPath" $(join-path $Jsh.UtilsRawPath $env:PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE)
$Jsh | add-member NoteProperty "GoMap" @{}
$Jsh | add-member NoteProperty "ScriptMap" @{}

#==============================================================================

#==============================================================================
# Functions 
#==============================================================================

# Load snapin's if they are available
function Jsh.Load-Snapin([string]$name) {
    $list = @( get-pssnapin | ? { $_.Name -eq $name })
    if ( $list.Length -gt 0 ) {
        return; 
    }

    $snapin = get-pssnapin -registered | ? { $_.Name -eq $name }
    if ( $snapin -ne $null ) {
        add-pssnapin $name
    }
}

# Update the configuration from the source code server
function Jsh.Update-WinConfig([bool]$force=$false) {

    # First see if we've updated in the last day 
    $target = join-path $env:temp "Jsh.Update.txt"
    $update = $false
    if ( test-path $target ) {
        $last = [datetime] (gc $target)
        if ( ([DateTime]::Now - $last).Days -gt 1) {
            $update = $true
        }
    } else {
        $update = $true;
    }

    if ( $update -or $force ) {
        write-host "Checking for winconfig updates"
        pushd $Jsh.ConfigPath
        $output = @(& svn update)
        if ( $output.Length -gt 1 ) {
            write-host "WinConfig updated.  Re-running configuration"
            cd $Jsh.ScriptPath
            & .\ConfigureAll.ps1
            . .\Profile.ps1
        }

        sc $target $([DateTime]::Now)
        popd
    }
}

function Jsh.Push-Path([string] $location) { 
    go $location $true 
}
function Jsh.Go-Path([string] $location, [bool]$push = $false) {
    if ( $location -eq "" ) {
        write-output $Jsh.GoMap
    } elseif ( $Jsh.GoMap.ContainsKey($location) ) {
        if ( $push ) {
            push-location $Jsh.GoMap[$location]
        } else {
            set-location $Jsh.GoMap[$location]
        }
    } elseif ( test-path $location ) {
        if ( $push ) {
            push-location $location
        } else {
            set-location $location
        }
    } else {
        write-output "$loctaion is not a valid go location"
        write-output "Current defined locations"
        write-output $Jsh.GoMap
    }
}

function Jsh.Run-Script([string] $name) {
    if ( $Jsh.ScriptMap.ContainsKey($name) ) {
        . $Jsh.ScriptMap[$name]
    } else {
        write-output "$name is not a valid script location"
        write-output $Jsh.ScriptMap
    }
}


# Set the prompt
function prompt() {
    if ( Test-Admin ) { 
        write-host -NoNewLine -f red "Admin "
    }
    write-host -NoNewLine -ForegroundColor Green $(get-location)
    foreach ( $entry in (get-location -stack)) {
    	write-host -NoNewLine -ForegroundColor Red '+';
    }
    write-host -NoNewLine -ForegroundColor Green '>'
    ' '
}

#==============================================================================

#==============================================================================
# Alias 
#==============================================================================
set-alias gcid      Get-ChildItemDirectory
set-alias wget      Get-WebItem
set-alias ss        select-string
set-alias ssr       Select-StringRecurse 
set-alias go        Jsh.Go-Path
set-alias gop       Jsh.Push-Path
set-alias script    Jsh.Run-Script
set-alias ia        Invoke-Admin
set-alias ica       Invoke-CommandAdmin
set-alias isa       Invoke-ScriptAdmin
#==============================================================================

pushd $Jsh.ScriptPath

# Setup the go locations
$Jsh.GoMap["ps"]        = $Jsh.ScriptPath
$Jsh.GoMap["config"]    = $Jsh.ConfigPath
$Jsh.GoMap["~"]         = "~"

# Setup load locations
$Jsh.ScriptMap["profile"]       = join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "Profile.ps1"
$Jsh.ScriptMap["common"]        = $(join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "LibraryCommon.ps1")
$Jsh.ScriptMap["svn"]           = $(join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "LibrarySubversion.ps1")
$Jsh.ScriptMap["subversion"]    = $(join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "LibrarySubversion.ps1")
$Jsh.ScriptMap["favorites"]     = $(join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "LibraryFavorites.ps1")
$Jsh.ScriptMap["registry"]      = $(join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "LibraryRegistry.ps1")
$Jsh.ScriptMap["reg"]           = $(join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "LibraryRegistry.ps1")
$Jsh.ScriptMap["token"]         = $(join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "LibraryTokenize.ps1")
$Jsh.ScriptMap["unit"]          = $(join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "LibraryUnitTest.ps1")
$Jsh.ScriptMap["tfs"]           = $(join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "LibraryTfs.ps1")
$Jsh.ScriptMap["tab"]           = $(join-path $Jsh.ScriptPath "TabExpansion.ps1")

# Load the common functions
. script common
. script tab
$global:libCommonCertPath = (join-path $Jsh.ConfigPath "Data\Certs\jaredp_code.pfx")

# Load the snapin's we want
Jsh.Load-Snapin "pscx"
Jsh.Load-Snapin "JshCmdlet" 

# Setup the Console look and feel
$host.UI.RawUI.ForegroundColor = "Yellow"
if ( Test-Admin ) {
    $title = "Administrator Shell - {0}" -f $host.UI.RawUI.WindowTitle
    $host.UI.RawUI.WindowTitle = $title;
}

# Call the computer specific profile
$compProfile = join-path "Computers" ($env:ComputerName + "_Profile.ps1")
if ( -not (test-path $compProfile)) { ni $compProfile -type File | out-null }
write-host "Computer profile: $compProfile"
. ".\$compProfile"
$Jsh.ScriptMap["cprofile"] = resolve-path ($compProfile)

# If the computer name is the same as the domain then we are not 
# joined to active directory
if ($env:UserDomain -ne $env:ComputerName ) {
    # Call the domain specific profile data
    write-host "Domain $env:UserDomain"
    $domainProfile = join-path $env:UserDomain "Profile.ps1"
    if ( -not (test-path $domainProfile))  { ni $domainProfile -type File | out-null }
    . ".\$domainProfile"
}

# Run the get-fortune command if JshCmdlet was loaded
if ( get-command "get-fortune" -ea SilentlyContinue ) {
    get-fortune -timeout 1000
}

# Finished with the profile, go back to the original directory
popd

# Look for updates
Jsh.Update-WinConfig

# Because this profile is run in the same context, we need to remove any 
# variables manually that we don't want exposed outside this script

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Where I copy the profile.ps1 ? Is it required reboot machine o restart winrm service? –  Kiquenet Feb 20 '13 at 11:52
    
@Kiquenet, just restart your powershell session. –  Christopher Ranney Mar 29 '13 at 19:16
    
+1, Very nicely segmented. Thanks. –  Sabuncu May 20 '13 at 18:50
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I put all my functions and aliases in separate script files and then dot source them in my profile:

. c:\scripts\posh\jdh-functions.ps1

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start-transcript. This will write out your entire session to a text file. Great for training new hires on how to use Powershell in the environment.

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+1 Thanks for the tip... That just fixed my problem with logging a Continuous Integration build both to the console and a log file. I'm disappointed it wasn't documented well in either "Windows Powershell pocket reference" or "Windows PowerShell in Action". I guess that's something you learn from practice. –  Peter Walke Dec 23 '09 at 23:39
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The function to view the entire history of typed command (Get-History, and his alias h show default only 32 last commands):

function ha {
    Get-History -count $MaximumHistoryCount
}
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i add this function so that i can see disk usage easily:

function df {
    $colItems = Get-wmiObject -class "Win32_LogicalDisk" -namespace "root\CIMV2" `
    -computername localhost

    foreach ($objItem in $colItems) {
    	write $objItem.DeviceID $objItem.Description $objItem.FileSystem `
    		($objItem.Size / 1GB).ToString("f3") ($objItem.FreeSpace / 1GB).ToString("f3")

    }
}
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My prompt contains:

$width = ($Host.UI.RawUI.WindowSize.Width - 2 - $(Get-Location).ToString().Length)
$hr = New-Object System.String @('-',$width)
Write-Host -ForegroundColor Red $(Get-Location) $hr

Which gives me a divider between commands that's easy to see when scrolling back. It also shows me the current directory without using horizontal space on the line that I'm typing on.

For example:

C:\Users\Jay ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[1] PS>

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I keep my profile empty. Instead, I have folders of scripts I can navigate to load functionality and aliases into the session. A folder will be modular, with libraries of functions and assemblies. For ad hoc work, I'll have a script to loads aliases and functions. If I want to munge event logs, I'd navigate to a folder scripts\eventlogs and execute

PS > . .\DotSourceThisToLoadSomeHandyEventLogMonitoringFunctions.ps1

I do this because I need to share scripts with others or move them from machine to machine. I like to be able to copy a folder of scripts and assemblies and have it just work on any machine for any user.

But you want a fun collection of tricks. Here's a script that many of my "profiles" depend on. It allows calls to web services that use self signed SSL for ad hoc exploration of web services in development. Yes, I freely mix C# in my powershell scripts.

# Using a target web service that requires SSL, but server is self-signed.  
# Without this, we'll fail unable to establish trust relationship. 
function Set-CertificateValidationCallback
{
    try
    {
       Add-Type @'
    using System;

    public static class CertificateAcceptor{

        public static void SetAccept()
        {
            System.Net.ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback = AcceptCertificate;
        }

        private static bool AcceptCertificate(Object sender,
                        System.Security.Cryptography.X509Certificates.X509Certificate certificate,
                        System.Security.Cryptography.X509Certificates.X509Chain chain,
                        System.Net.Security.SslPolicyErrors policyErrors)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Accepting certificate and ignoring any SSL errors.");
                return true;
            }
    }
'@
    }
    catch {} # Already exists? Find a better way to check.

     [CertificateAcceptor]::SetAccept()
}
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Set-PSDebug -Strict

You will benefit i you ever searched for a stupid Typo eg. outputting $varsometext instead $var sometext

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I make a type-o errors on the regular. Its very humbling to realize that the code you just change around 12 times works each way, but you still cant even spell the property name right. –  Christopher Ranney Mar 29 '13 at 19:19
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I often find myself needing needing some basic agregates to count/sum some things., I've defined these functions and use them often, they work really nicely at the end of a pipeline :

#
# useful agregate
#
function count
{
    BEGIN { $x = 0 }
    PROCESS { $x += 1 }
    END { $x }
}

function product
{
    BEGIN { $x = 1 }
    PROCESS { $x *= $_ }
    END { $x }
}

function sum
{
    BEGIN { $x = 0 }
    PROCESS { $x += $_ }
    END { $x }
}

function average
{
    BEGIN { $max = 0; $curr = 0 }
    PROCESS { $max += $_; $curr += 1 }
    END { $max / $curr }
}

To be able to get time and path with colors in my prompt :

function Get-Time { return $(get-date | foreach { $_.ToLongTimeString() } ) }
function prompt
{
    # Write the time 
    write-host "[" -noNewLine
    write-host $(Get-Time) -foreground yellow -noNewLine
    write-host "] " -noNewLine
    # Write the path
    write-host $($(Get-Location).Path.replace($home,"~").replace("\","/")) -foreground green -noNewLine
    write-host $(if ($nestedpromptlevel -ge 1) { '>>' }) -noNewLine
    return "> "
}

The following functions are stolen from a blog and modified to fit my taste, but ls with colors is very nice :

# LS.MSH 
# Colorized LS function replacement 
# /\/\o\/\/ 2006 
# http://mow001.blogspot.com 
function LL
{
    param ($dir = ".", $all = $false) 

    $origFg = $host.ui.rawui.foregroundColor 
    if ( $all ) { $toList = ls -force $dir }
    else { $toList = ls $dir }

    foreach ($Item in $toList)  
    { 
        Switch ($Item.Extension)  
        { 
            ".Exe" {$host.ui.rawui.foregroundColor = "Yellow"} 
            ".cmd" {$host.ui.rawui.foregroundColor = "Red"} 
            ".msh" {$host.ui.rawui.foregroundColor = "Red"} 
            ".vbs" {$host.ui.rawui.foregroundColor = "Red"} 
            Default {$host.ui.rawui.foregroundColor = $origFg} 
        } 
        if ($item.Mode.StartsWith("d")) {$host.ui.rawui.foregroundColor = "Green"}
        $item 
    }  
    $host.ui.rawui.foregroundColor = $origFg 
}

function lla
{
    param ( $dir=".")
    ll $dir $true
}

function la { ls -force }

And some shortcuts to avoid really repetitive filtering tasks :

# behave like a grep command
# but work on objects, used
# to be still be allowed to use grep
filter match( $reg )
{
    if ($_.tostring() -match $reg)
        { $_ }
}

# behave like a grep -v command
# but work on objects
filter exclude( $reg )
{
    if (-not ($_.tostring() -match $reg))
        { $_ }
}

# behave like match but use only -like
filter like( $glob )
{
    if ($_.toString() -like $glob)
        { $_ }
}

filter unlike( $glob )
{
    if (-not ($_.tostring() -like $glob))
        { $_ }
}
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This comment adds no value, but I just want to say your username is awesome. –  Chris Francis Oct 21 '13 at 12:04
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You can see my PowerShell profile at http://github.com/jamesottaway/windowspowershell

If you use Git to clone my repo into your Documents folder (or whatever folder is above 'WindowsPowerShell' in your $PROFILE variable), you'll get all of my goodness.

The main profile.ps1 sets the subfolder with the name Addons as a PSDrive, and then finds all .ps1 files underneath that folder to load.

I quite like the go command, which stores a dictionary of shorthand locations to visit easily. For example, go vsp will take me to C:\Visual Studio 2008\Projects.

I also like overriding the Set-Location cmdlet to run both Set-Location and Get-ChildItem.

My other favourite is being able to do a mkdir which does Set-Location xyz after running New-Item xyz -Type Directory.

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I actually keep mine on github.

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Function funcOpenPowerShellProfile
{
    Notepad $PROFILE
}

Set-Alias fop funcOpenPowerShellProfile

Only a sagaciously-lazy individual would tell you that fop is so much easier to type than Notepad $PROFILE at the prompt, unless, of course, you associate "fop" with a 17th century English ninny.


If you wanted, you could take it a step further and make it somewhat useful:

Function funcOpenPowerShellProfile
{
    $fileProfileBackup = $PROFILE + '.bak'
    cp $PROFILE $fileProfileBackup
    PowerShell_ISE $PROFILE # Replace with Desired IDE/ISE for Syntax Highlighting
}

Set-Alias fop funcOpenPowerShellProfile

For satisfying survivalist-paranoia:

Function funcOpenPowerShellProfile
{
    $fileProfilePathParts = @($PROFILE.Split('\'))
    $fileProfileName = $fileProfilePathParts[-1]
    $fileProfilePathPartNum = 0
    $fileProfileHostPath = $fileProfilePathParts[$fileProfilePathPartNum] + '\'
    $fileProfileHostPathPartsCount = $fileProfilePathParts.Count - 2
        # Arrays start at 0, but the Count starts at 1; if both started at 0 or 1, 
        # then a -1 would be fine, but the realized discrepancy is 2
    Do
    {
        $fileProfilePathPartNum++
        $fileProfileHostPath = $fileProfileHostPath + `
            $fileProfilePathParts[$fileProfilePathPartNum] + '\'
    }
    While
    (
        $fileProfilePathPartNum -LT $fileProfileHostPathPartsCount
    )
    $fileProfileBackupTime = [string](date -format u) -replace ":", ""
    $fileProfileBackup = $fileProfileHostPath + `
        $fileProfileBackupTime + ' - ' + $fileProfileName + '.bak'
    cp $PROFILE $fileProfileBackup

    cd $fileProfileHostPath
    $fileProfileBackupNamePattern = $fileProfileName + '.bak'
    $fileProfileBackups = @(ls | Where {$_.Name -Match $fileProfileBackupNamePattern} | `
        Sort Name)
    $fileProfileBackupsCount = $fileProfileBackups.Count
    $fileProfileBackupThreshold = 5 # Change as Desired
    If
    (
        $fileProfileBackupsCount -GT $fileProfileBackupThreshold
    )
    {
        $fileProfileBackupsDeleteNum = $fileProfileBackupsCount - `
            $fileProfileBackupThreshold
        $fileProfileBackupsIndexNum = 0
        Do
        {

            rm $fileProfileBackups[$fileProfileBackupsIndexNum]
            $fileProfileBackupsIndexNum++;
            $fileProfileBackupsDeleteNum--
        }
        While
        (
            $fileProfileBackupsDeleteNum -NE 0
        )
    }

    PowerShell_ISE $PROFILE
        # Replace 'PowerShell_ISE' with Desired IDE (IDE's path may be needed in 
        # '$Env:PATH' for this to work; if you can start it from the "Run" window, 
        # you should be fine)
}

Set-Alias fop funcOpenPowerShellProfile
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amongst many other things:

function w {
    explorer .
}

opens an explorer window in the current directory

function startover {
    iisreset /restart
    iisreset /stop

    rm "C:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\Temporary ASP.NET Files\*.*" -recurse -force -Verbose

    iisreset /start
}

gets rid of everything in my temporary asp.net files (useful for working on managed code that has dependencies on buggy unmanaged code)

function edit($x) {
    . 'C:\Program Files (x86)\Notepad++\notepad++.exe' $x
}

edits $x in notepad++

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I'm glad this thread exists, very cool!

I rock a few functions, since I'm a module author I typically load a console and desperately need to know whats where.

write-host "Your modules are..." -ForegroundColor Red
Get-module -li

Die hard nerding

function prompt
{
$host.UI.RawUI.WindowTitle = "ShellPower"
#Need to still show the working directory.
#Write-Host "You landed in $PWD"

    #nerd up, yo.
    $Str = "Root@The Matrix"
"$str> "
}

the mandatory anything I can powershell I will functions go here...

# explorer command
function Explore
{     
param  
    (  
        [Parameter(
            Position = 0,
            ValueFromPipeline=$true,
            Mandatory=$true,
            HelpMessage="This is the path to explore..."
        )]
        [ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()]
        [string]
        #First param is the path you're going to explore. 
        $Target
    )
$exploriation = New-Object -ComObject shell.application
$exploriation.Explore($Target)
}

I am STILL an administrator so I do need...

Function RDP
{
param  
        (  
            [Parameter(
                Position = 0,
                ValueFromPipeline=$true,
                Mandatory=$true,
                HelpMessage="Server Friendly name"
            )]
            [ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()]
            [string]
            $server
        )
    cmdkey /generic:TERMSRV/$server /user:$UserName /pass:($Password.GetNetworkCredential().Password)
    mstsc /v:$Server /f /admin
    Wait-Event -Timeout 5
    cmdkey /Delete:TERMSRV/$server

}

Sometimes I want to start explorer as someone other than the logged in user...

#restarts explorer as the user in $UserName
function New-Explorer
{
            #CLI prompt for password

taskkill /f /IM Explorer.exe
runas /noprofile /netonly /user:$UserName explorer

}

This is just because its funny.

Function Lock-RemoteWorkstation 
{ 
param( 
$Computername, 
$Credential 
) 
    if(!(get-module taskscheduler)){Import-Module TaskScheduler} 
    New-task -ComputerName $Computername -credential:$Credential |  
    Add-TaskTrigger -In (New-TimeSpan -Seconds 30) | 
    Add-TaskAction -Script ` 
    {  
    $signature = @"  
    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]  
    public static extern bool LockWorkStation();  
"@  
    $LockWorkStation = Add-Type -memberDefinition $signature -name "Win32LockWorkStation" -namespace Win32Functions -passthru  
    $LockWorkStation::LockWorkStation() | Out-Null 
    } | Register-ScheduledTask TestTask -ComputerName $Computername -credential:$Credential 
}

I also have one for me, since WIN+L is too far away..

Function llm #lock Local machine
{

 $signature = @"  
    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]  
    public static extern bool LockWorkStation();  
"@  
    $LockWorkStation = Add-Type -memberDefinition $signature -name "Win32LockWorkStation" -namespace Win32Functions -passthru  

    $LockWorkStation::LockWorkStation()|Out-Null
}

Few filters? I think so...

 filter FileSizeBelow($size){if($_.length -le $size){ $_ }}
 filter FileSizeAbove($size){if($_.Length -ge $size){$_}}

I also have a few I cant post yet, because they're not done but they're basically a way to persist credentials between sessions without writing them out as an encrypted file.

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