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For large problems sizes, an algorithm with time cost O(2^n) is faster than an algorithm that has time cost O(N^2)

Is this true or false?

What I think is that if C^n, C = constant and C > 1, then it will grow faster than O(N^2). Is this correct?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For large problems sizes, an algorithm with time cost O(2n) is faster than an algorithm that has time cost O(n2).

FALSE, because 2n > n2 for n > 4, and greater means slower.

For C = constant and C > 1, Cn grows faster than O(n2).

TRUE.

Here is a Wolfram|Alpha reference.

enter image description here

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Thank you very much. So 2^N is greater than N^2 which means that N^2 is faster right?? I thought greater means faster.. –  hibc Dec 11 '12 at 6:49
    
@hibc correct, because cost is not a great word ^_- –  Dante is not a Geek Dec 11 '12 at 6:54
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Yes, c^n grows faster than n^2, if c>1
if c=1 then c^n =1
if c<1 then c^n "decays"

Proof for c>1
let t(n) = (c^n)/(n^2)
now lim n-> infinity t(n) = (By L'Hospitals Rule) = lim (d/dn c^n) / lim(d/dn n^2)
= lim (d/dn c^n lg n) / lim(d/dn 2n)    
= lim (d/dn c^n lg n * lg n) / lim(d/dn 2)
-> infinity.

So by property described in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_O_notation#Related_asymptotic_notations, we say that n^2 grows slower.

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d/dn c^n = c^n * log(c), so it should be c^n*lg^2(c)/2 -> inf –  robert king Dec 11 '12 at 7:58
    
yeah I meant that and not c^n lg (n lg n) Sorry for the confusion –  Manas Paldhe Dec 11 '12 at 8:07
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It's clearly false. You can convince yourself of this by trial and error of different values of N.

2^5 = 32 versus 5^2 = 25
2^6 = 64 versus 6^2 = 36
2^7 = 128 versus 7^2 = 49

As you can see, the exponential grows much faster than the quadratic.

To prove this claim, I would use induction with the base case of N=5. This step is left as an exercise to the reader.

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Thank you very much!! So the greater value means time cost is much slower. Did I get it right?? –  hibc Dec 11 '12 at 6:50
    
Well you said the functions represent "time cost" so yes. A greater time cost would mean slower execution (by definition). –  tskuzzy Dec 11 '12 at 6:53
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Yes, c^n grows faster than n^2.

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Put reference or give more details. –  HabeebPerwad Dec 11 '12 at 6:06
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