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Need some clarification about java.util.list. I am using eclipse for development.
I wrote this code

public static void main(String[] asdf){
        List<Integer> lst = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        for(int i=0;i<10000;i++){
            lst.add(i);
        }

        System.out.println(lst.size());

        for(int i=0;i<10000;i++){
            if((i%50)==0){
                lst.remove(i);
            }           
        }
        System.out.println(lst.size());

    }

But when i run this code it gives exception

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException: Index: 9850, Size: 9803
    at java.util.ArrayList.rangeCheck(ArrayList.java:604)
    at java.util.ArrayList.remove(ArrayList.java:445)
    at com.ilex.reports.action.rpt.CNSReports.main(CNSReports.java:301)

one more this to note is enter image description here

Then i did one change in code i-e iterated 2nd loop till 5000 only and it worked fine

enter image description here

Questions are Why giving IndexOutOfBoundsException ?

What is that modCoutn ?

Do any of this thing become reason for memory Leak if yes how to resolve it ?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
2  
plus point for declaring it as a list. It is usually better to use an iterator to iterate over it though. –  BevynQ Dec 11 '12 at 6:14
    
@shah look at my answer, may be it is what you really want? –  kornero Dec 11 '12 at 6:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Removing elements from a list makes it smaller. Your second loop runs until 10000, but the list will have shrunk to less than 10000 by the time it gets there.

In fact, if your intent is to remove all multiples of 50, you could loop backwards from 10000 to 0, with a step size of 50 and avoid this problem, and be faster.

for (int i=9950; i>=0; i-=50){
    lst.remove(i);
}

Note that your current approach, if your intent is to remove the multiples of 50, won't work, since after the first remove the invariant that the value at each index is the index, no longer holds.

modCount is an internal variable that ArrayList uses to detect whether it is changed in reference to any Iterators over it. It basically counts all modifications to the List. An Iterator keeps its own count, and checks whether it remains in sync with the List.

Your code is not causing any memory to leak. In java memory 'leaks' if Objects that are no longer used are still referenced so they cannot be garbage collected. But since everything in the example is passed outside the scope of the method, everything can be gc'd once the method is left. (and since it is the main method, the vm will stop running and release its memory too)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer... can you explain it more for memory leak –  zzzz Dec 11 '12 at 6:22
    
I can only type so fast :) Editors should have code completion too. –  bowmore Dec 11 '12 at 6:29
    
sorry to disturb you... i thought you had done with the answer, thanks again for nice and complete answer :) –  zzzz Dec 11 '12 at 6:30
1  
Scope only dictates a space to refer to a name, not object lifetime. If you were to assign lst to a field or pass it to a method that stores a reference elsewhere lst would still be scoped to that method, yet live potentially longer. Of course, since the method is the entry point in this case this is moot, but generally the two things are not the same. –  Joey Dec 11 '12 at 6:40
    
+1 for suggesting a decreasing counter. However, your start value assumes the list size and may not be equivalent to (ie. remove the same elements as) the original code. You may find this start value with int len = lst.size(), i = len - (len % 50) –  Yanick Rochon Dec 11 '12 at 6:51

A list is not an array, even if an ArrayList is backed by an array.

intArray[i] = null;

is not the same as

arrayList.remove(i);

In the second (using the ArrayList), you are actually shifting all elements i+1 and up downward, thus decreasing the size of your list.

If you need to remove elements from a list, from you which you are doing an iteration, you may use an Iterator :

Iterator<Integer> iterator = list.iterator();
int i = 0;
while (iterator.hasNext()) {
    iterator.next(); // consume current item
    if ((i++ % 50) == 0) {
        iterator.remove();
    }
}

Or you could use this hacky hack

for(int i=0, len=lst.size();i<len;i++){
    if((i%50)==0){
        lst.remove(i);
        len--;  // decrease size of upper bound check
    }           
}

// or better...
for (int len=lst.size() - 1, i=len - (len % 50); i>=0; i-=50){
   lst.remove(i);
}

... but the iterator solution is how you should tackle this situation usually how to step through a Collection.

The modCount is incremented every time you add or remove an element in your List (ArrayList). This is important, because when you are iterating through your elements, you don't want to "miss" or have something else change your elements midway. (This is particularly true in a multithreaded application.) Therefore, if some process modify your ArrayList while using an iterator, you will get a ConcurrentModificationException warning you that your list has changed since the iterator was created. (see List.iterator())

Finally, to your last question, you should not get concerned about memory leaks and ArrayList, unless the elements of your list are referenced somewhere else. In Java, as soon as an object is not referenced by any other object, it is candidate for garbage collection.

share|improve this answer
    
remove method in Iterator is optional, and many Lists don't support it. –  kornero Dec 11 '12 at 6:32
    
@kornero, other list implementations are not discussed in the question. And it is possible to wrap the unsupported iterator implementation inside a different collection that does support it, or use a secondary list to store all elements to remove. ...but this is entering speculations and out of scope of the question. :) –  Yanick Rochon Dec 11 '12 at 6:43

When you remove an element in list your list size became smaller.

share|improve this answer
 List<Integer> removeElements = new ArrayList<Integer>(); 
 for(int i=0;i<10000;i++){
            if((i%50)==0){
                removeElements.add(lst.get(i));
            }           
        }

 lst.removeAll(removeElements);

This is the safer way to do this

REGARDING MEMORY LEAK:

Here you dont have to worry about memory leak, as memory leak occurs when references get stuck longer than required and do not get Garbage collected. This usually occurs due to static references.

share|improve this answer

You probably wants to do this:

for(int i=0;i<10000;i++){
        if((i%50)==0){
            lst.remove(Integer.valueof(i));
        }           
    }

List has 2 remove methods, by index and by Object. Your list contains OBJECTS, you add into it some "int i" (primitive), but compiler replace it with autoboxing:

Integer.valueof(i)

So when you remove, you remove not by Object, but by index.

For example, you have list: {3, 2, 1}

When you call:

  • remove(0), list became: {2, 1} // remove by id
  • remove(1), list became: {3, 1} // remove by id
  • remove(Integer.valueof(1)), list became: {3, 2} // remove by object
share|improve this answer

1st Point: In this part of the code you are removing the elements of the list see:

for(int i=0;i<10000;i++){
            if((i%50)==0){
                lst.remove(i);
            }           
        }

That is why your list size is getting reduced and you get that error i-e java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException

2nd Point: modCount looks like the internal count of eclipse for the list. 3rd point: this will not become reason for memory leak as list size is getting reduced.

Hope this will help you.

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